So what scenarios have you played Recently?

Ric of The LBC

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Here's an image at the end of The Generalissimo's Own. Some of the stacks have been pushed aside from the buildings when we did the VP count, as well as the vehicle wrecks being out of place for the same reason. View attachment 27249
I gacked the 4-1 melee in G8 (well, almost all my CC attempts). Probably should have jumped into CC with the crew in H7 with the two 447. We were under pressure to finish the last turn so the club could go out to dinner. Fun time as always when playing Fen.
 
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johnl

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I gacked the 4-1 melee in G8 (well, almost all my CC attempts). Probably should have jumped into CC with the crew in H7 with the two 447. We were under pressure to finish the last turn so the club could go out to dinner. Fun time as always when playing Fen.
Sorry about screwing up that last attack, sir, but I had a dinner date. :):p

We had a fun game day, eh?
 

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AP 196 Silver & Bronze

I give this one a gold medal for Olympic-level drama. Just days into the Ardennes Offensive, an American combined arms force of 14 squads and eight AFV finds itself sandwiched between two separate German formations, each with a mix of infantry and armor totaling 25 squads and seven AFV. The Germans win by scoring 80 CVP, after deduction for CVP scored by the Americans, plus one CVP per building hex controlled. The three-board playing space centers on hilly village terrain with a town and county mix in the north and a chateau and country mix in the south. It’s clear the Germans must capture a lot of terrain – to rack up building CVP – while also winning firefights along the way to reach that sky high 80-point goal.

The Americans face some agonizing set up choices. The two level-2 hills (overlays) at midfield seem like obvious spots on which to plant the two Wolverines whose 76L ROF 2 guns could with a little luck – side shot or APCR 5 – take out a Hetzer or two. But if the Hetzers don’t offer a side shot and the Amis fail that APCR 5 those Wolverines would be sitting ducks silhouetted against the winter sky. Yes, hull down status would protect them for a while, but eventually one of those hardnosed Hetzers, or a German MMG, would find the exposed turret. Similarly, the Americans can set up just about anywhere and so could guard nearly all of the precious building hexes, but if they get too close to the board edges they risk getting swamped (and captured) by entering Germans for double CVP.

To avoid those pitfalls, the Americans left the level-2 hills bare and concentrated their forces on the center board, leaving most of the northern and southern boards empty. So, the German Grenadier company and four Hetzers stormed into the city-like space in the northeast on turn 1 to quickly gobble up buildings at a cost of only one-half squad killed by distant HMG fire. And, one bold Hetzer even caught a Sherman napping, it failed motion and smoke pots, so the Hetzer killed it one turn later with defensive fire.

On turn 2, most Fallschirmjagear and three Stugs came on from the southeast to capture the chateau with no casualties because the far away Americans couldn’t get a decent shot through the falling snow. A single platoon came in on the southwest to capture two outlying buildings and, more importantly, attract an American Sherman and two squads who might have been more useful elsewhere.

On turn 3, the now-in-position Stugs successfully fired smoke at the American HMG position in a hilltop building at mid field. The German MMGs followed up with fire to break an American MMG position. So, the Fallschirmjager and Grenadiers could now move through the open. Then a Stug and two Hetzers rushed a lone Wolverine from opposite sides, all outside of its covered arc. The prey remained cool as the Stug fired and missed and then stunned one CE Hetzer with AA MG fire, but missed with MA against the last Hetzer who then returned fire to kill the Wolverine.

With that the Germans were 2/3rds of the way to victory with no AFV losses while the Americans were down two AFV and two key MG positions. So, the Amis conceded and reflected that they should have set up a little further forward to contest more buildings.
 

Michael R

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We had a rare gathering of four Montréal ASL players. Erik Linblad (center) invited people over for a day of ASL. Andre Escobedo (left) and Martin Marquis (right) and I were able to make it. Andre suggested playing scenarios from Saint Mére-Église and that is what we did. We played two short ones: SM2 SELDOM PRACTICAL in the morning and SM8 WITHOUT THOUGHT OF NUMBERS in the afternoon. The morning action had one American win and one German win. The afternoon action had one German win and one DNF.

I had a first and it was something encouraged in SM8. I used the OB given hero to operate the AT gun after recovering it. The hero had two chances to fire it point blank at moving Germans. The results were 1.5 dead German squads. Awesome!

27283
 

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Played J211 Breakthrough in the Arctic with George Bates the German defender and me the attacking Russians. Russians need to capture 3 of 4 multi-story buildings. 14 x stout 8ML troops for the Russian plus two KV-1, but the Germans have 5 x 468 and 6 x 467, 2 x MMGs, 2 x schrecks to keep the Russians careful.

The attackers entered cautiously-- most everybody spread out – no stacking. In turn two I was able to make a dent in the defenders OB by capturing three squads and a leader. The leader capture was large as an 8-1 was paired with a 468/MMG on the other side of the river at Level 2 and thus only one remaining was on the village right flank. Going forward, any German MMC on the village left flank that broke would be hard-pressed to rally.

In the end, end of turn three, a couple breaks meant the left VC building (defended by a lone 247) would inevitably fall. Also, the L4 building was under extreme pressure. In my upcoming turns, the remaining KV-1’s assignment would be to freeze, or at a minimum, make the defender burn its DFF. With most of the Russian OB intact and four Russian turns to go, the Germans saw the writing on the wall and conceded.

Situation at game end
27309

We talked through this scenario at length and we both liked it. On reflection, George felt his defense was a tad too up front which allowed the Russians to cut his rout path and take those prisoners. We also talked about the 9-1/468/MMG across the river and agreed that while it’s an interesting idea, the loss of the 9-1’s rallying ability is likely not worth its placement there. Lastly, George opted to not utilize the set DC SSR and used it as part of his OB. For me, I felt the Russian had the strength and time to get the job done, and over-aggressiveness (which I can suffer from) could create a hole difficult from which to recover. This scenario is definitely worth a play. Thanks to George for an enjoyable game!
 
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PS NJ

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J234 Buckley's Chance
Ron Duenskie and I took a 2-hour ride to get to the Reading, PA to visit Rob Schoenen, who hosted an excellent ASL get-together. Jim Brackin and Ron played Battle of Rome and Rob served some delicious sandwiches and chile. After our scenarios we had a fun apocalyptic car race/battle game. I was ahead early in the car game, but then mysteriously (to me anyway) ended up in last place :).

In ASL, I played Kevin Meyer in this IJA/AUS Timor scenario from the recent Journal with the dice giving me the IJA. I had a dozen 448/447 with two MMG, two mortars, and (on turn 3) two HA-GOs. I had 6 turns to go 17 hexes on the nice historical map and exit 10 CVP (with the tanks counting for 2 each). Kevin had 11 458/457 with 3 lmg, 2 mortars, an ATR and (also on turn 3) two carriers which brought a 2nd ATR.

The map is covered by palm/huts/light jungle/kunai with little open ground and only a few wooden buildings. It feels like almost a naval battle in that there is little effective fire that isn't adjacent. It seemed more about very fluid maneuver than holding key ground. Kevin spread out and I punched into the middle turn 1. Turn 2 my mortars both forget to bring either WP or smoke, so I just pushed forward up the gut.

Turn 3 my mortar got a CH on one of Kevin's mortar teams to break it. During the course of the game I had four half squads go berserk, which gave me a couple free banzai-like charges each turn and soaked up a lot of firepower. By turn 4, we had each lost about 4 squads. Kevin abandoned the carriers to avoid THHs and fell back to the 4-hex wide exit area.

Turn 5 I ran the Ha-GOs off, my 1 armor proving tough enough to survive one ATR and one lmg hit. My 10-1/228/448 schwerepunkt died in HtH CC to a lowly 247. Close combat was fairly brutal throughout the game.

Turn 6 I managed to use a captured Aussie mortar to get two(!) smoke shots which gave me the cover I needed to exit. I exited the required points for the win, but only had 5 CVP left on board. If I hadn't gotten smoke with the mortar, it would have been very tough. All in all a fun game with an excellent opponent. I'd recommend the scenario.
 
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Carln0130

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J234 Buckley's Chance
Ron Duenskie took a 2-hour ride to get to the Reading, PA to visit Rob Schoenen, who hosted an excellent ASL get-together. Jim Brackin and Ron played Battle of Rome and Rob served some delicious sandwiches and chile. After our scenarios we had a fun apocalyptic car race/battle game. I was ahead early in the car game, but then mysteriously (to me anyway) ended up in last place :).

In ASL, I played Kevin Meyer in this IJA/AUS Timor scenario from the recent Journal with the dice giving me the IJA. I had a dozen 448/447 with two MMG, two mortars, and (on turn 3) two HA-GOs. I had 6 turns to go 17 hexes on the nice historical map and exit 10 CVP (with the tanks counting for 2 each). Kevin had 11 458/457 with 3 lmg, 2 mortars, an ATR and (also on turn 3) two carriers which brought a 2nd ATR.

The map is covered by palm/huts/light jungle/kunai with little open ground and only a few wooden buildings. It feels like almost a naval battle in that there is little effective fire that isn't adjacent. It seemed more about very fluid maneuver than holding key ground. Kevin spread out and I punched into the middle turn 1. Turn 2 my mortars both forget to bring either WP or smoke, so I just pushed forward up the gut.

Turn 3 my mortar got a CH on one of Kevin's mortar teams to break it. During the course of the game I had four half squads go berserk, which gave me a couple free banzai-like charges each turn and soaked up a lot of firepower. By turn 4, we had each lost about 4 squads. Kevin abandoned the carriers to avoid THHs and fell back to the 4-hex wide exit area.

Turn 5 I ran the Ha-GOs off, my 1 armor proving tough enough to survive one ATR and one lmg hit. My 10-1/228/448 schwerepunkt died in HtH CC to a lowly 247. Close combat was fairly brutal throughout the game.

Turn 6 I managed to use a captured Aussie mortar to get two(!) smoke shots which gave me the cover I needed to exit. I exited the required points for the win, but only had 5 CVP left on board. If I hadn't gotten smoke with the mortar, it would have been very tough. All in all a fun game with an excellent opponent. I'd recommend the scenario.
Paul, what was the name of the scenario you played please?
 

Vic Provost

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J234 Buckley's Chance
Ron Duenskie took a 2-hour ride to get to the Reading, PA to visit Rob Schoenen, who hosted an excellent ASL get-together. Jim Brackin and Ron played Battle of Rome and Rob served some delicious sandwiches and chile. After our scenarios we had a fun apocalyptic car race/battle game. I was ahead early in the car game, but then mysteriously (to me anyway) ended up in last place :).

In ASL, I played Kevin Meyer in this IJA/AUS Timor scenario from the recent Journal with the dice giving me the IJA. I had a dozen 448/447 with two MMG, two mortars, and (on turn 3) two HA-GOs. I had 6 turns to go 17 hexes on the nice historical map and exit 10 CVP (with the tanks counting for 2 each). Kevin had 11 458/457 with 3 lmg, 2 mortars, an ATR and (also on turn 3) two carriers which brought a 2nd ATR.

The map is covered by palm/huts/light jungle/kunai with little open ground and only a few wooden buildings. It feels like almost a naval battle in that there is little effective fire that isn't adjacent. It seemed more about very fluid maneuver than holding key ground. Kevin spread out and I punched into the middle turn 1. Turn 2 my mortars both forget to bring either WP or smoke, so I just pushed forward up the gut.

Turn 3 my mortar got a CH on one of Kevin's mortar teams to break it. During the course of the game I had four half squads go berserk, which gave me a couple free banzai-like charges each turn and soaked up a lot of firepower. By turn 4, we had each lost about 4 squads. Kevin abandoned the carriers to avoid THHs and fell back to the 4-hex wide exit area.

Turn 5 I ran the Ha-GOs off, my 1 armor proving tough enough to survive one ATR and one lmg hit. My 10-1/228/448 schwerepunkt died in HtH CC to a lowly 247. Close combat was fairly brutal throughout the game.

Turn 6 I managed to use a captured Aussie mortar to get two(!) smoke shots which gave me the cover I needed to exit. I exited the required points for the win, but only had 5 CVP left on board. If I hadn't gotten smoke with the mortar, it would have been very tough. All in all a fun game with an excellent opponent. I'd recommend the scenario.
Nice scenario Paul, I got lucky with my tanks too as the IJA barely squeaked out a win against Steve Johns. I would play either side, good scenario and love the Sparrow Force map & campaign, great manageable PTO fun.
 

Carln0130

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Paul, what was the name of the scenario you played please?
Never mind. So, you're saying the J234 Buckley's Chance thing at the top should have clued me in.......................huh? I'm sure there's a perfectly good excuse for this. As soon as I come up with one I'll get back to you.........................................
 

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Played FT307 Backstabbing Paratroopers as the Partisan/Russian defenders against the attacking Germans led by fellow Twin Cities ASLer, and all-around great guy, John Bock. This is a challenging puzzle that can be won by either side. It’s 4.5 turn length and modest OB (with variable OB for both sides, nice) makes it perfect to play without a large time commitment.

The Germans need to control ≥2 multi-hex buildings (of five) and have ten squads and a StuG to get the job done. The Allies defense is stretched at the start with 6.5 squads and only one leader, but receive 5.5 squads as turn 3 reinforcements. They will be tasked with slowing down the attackers in order to get them into position for a final defense.

The Germans attacked on the bottom half of board q through the Y8 area. I had a setup gaff that allowed a couple large stacks to make uncontested progress to the Z/AA hexrow area. Fortunately, in turn 2 they were slowed up thanks to some troop repositioning, accurate shooting and gobs of residual. In the end, this delay proved just enough as the Allied turn 3 reinforcements were able to get positioned. The Germans called off the attack in the bottom of turn 4 after their DFF was ineffective and dislodging the Allies from another VC building appeared unlikely.

Highly recommended for a fun, well-balanced (now 9-11 on ROAR), fast-playing scenario. Thanks to John for an enjoyable game.

Final positions
27346
 
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gorkowskij

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Stand and Die, WCW 10

The title is false advertising. My opponent (the Japanese) may have discovered a flaw in this scenario that deflated the fun factor for both of us. Since this is pre-1938 (December 1937), No Quarter (G18.7) is NOT in effect and Chinese KMT troops can surrender. Given double CVP for captured units, the Japanese have more incentive to capture Chinese squads (4 CVP each) than buildings, one prisoner squad is worth as much as 4-hex building! Similarly, the Chinese gun and AFV are each a CVP bonanza if captured. So, the Japanese need not banzai, but rather just use their MMGs, mortars, and AFV to gang up on one squad per turn to reap huge CVP rewards via capture without any need for substantial territorial gains. The scenario also has some historicity issues worth noting.

In our game, Japan came on strong along their right (the Chinese left) to target gaps in the jungle and bamboo at 24CC9 and FF7; the KMT had three squads nearby with an ATR and LMG on defense. Chinese defensive fire immediately knocked out a zippy TE-KE (with an ATR) and KIA-ed one Japanese squad. A single Japanese platoon entered center south to take the (empty) board 35 hamlet. The Chinese left flank then retreated in good order to better cover while half the Chinese armor, including the 20mm MAs, rumbled to the 24CC9 gap area to establish over watch, but none of that mattered.

Japanese armor drove right through Chinese covered arcs and laughed as rounds missed or bounced off. Then the Japanese stopped, fired, and killed the Chinese armor. But, even if the armor battle was a wash, with equal losses to both sides, that would have been ok for Japan as they pursued their core strategy of capturing one Chinese squad at a time. They just picked the nearest KMT squad and ganged up on it with 75% of the Japanese OB using MMGs and mortars to break the target and then seal route paths while one infantry element moved adjacent. Copious smoke certainly helped, but the root problem is double CVP for captured units. The Japanese never advanced further than 10 hexes from the board edge since by then (turn five) they had racked up more VP than the Chinese by winning the armor battle, capturing three squads, and taking the eight outlying buildings, which the Chinese cannot afford to defend for fear of getting captured. The Chinese still had their 9-2 leader, seven GO squads, three AFVs, and their gun as well as unchallenged control of the central village on board 24 with its 20 VP bounty, but essentially lost the game because three squads got taken prisoner, rather than KIA.

None of that reflected “Stand and Die.” And the Japanese had zero incentive to “assault the last Chinese defenses surrounding Shanghai.” Instead, they just nibbled at the edges in a really slow game that covered only a small fraction of the map board.

On historicity, the scenario seems to conflate the battles of Shanghai and Nanjing because it refers to Shanghai and Chapei without ever mentioning Nanjing even though the circumstances actually match the Nanjing campaign. The scenario claims to be set in Shanghai on December 7, but the fighting for Shanghai ended in November, just as the fighting for Nanjing was picking up. The scenario refers to “Chapei Province,” but there is no such province anywhere in China; “Chapei” was an urban district of Shanghai that was in rubble at the time of this scenario, no rice paddies or wide open spaces like on the map. The PzK IAs of the “3rd armored battalion” presented in the scenario never fought in Shanghai, but rather Nanjing, see Chinese vehicle note 3 on page H101. And the aftermath says “within five days the Japanese then smashed their way into the city itself,” again that’s Nanjing which is not mentioned in the write up. The Japanese were, however, in central Shanghai (and Chabei) in August. And so on and so forth.
 

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Played FT307 Backstabbing Paratroopers as the Partisan/Russian defenders against the attacking Germans led by fellow Twin Cities ASLer, and all-around great guy, John Bock. This is a challenging puzzle that can be won by either side. It’s 4.5 turn length and modest OB (with variable OB for both sides, nice) makes it perfect to play without a large time commitment.

The Germans need to control ≥2 multi-hex buildings (of five) and have ten squads and a StuG to get the job done. The Allies defense is stretched at the start with 6.5 squads and only one leader, but receive 5.5 squads as turn 3 reinforcements. They will be tasked with slowing down the attackers in order to get them into position for a final defense.

The Germans attacked on the bottom half of board q through the Y8 area. I had a setup gaff that allowed a couple large stacks to make uncontested progress to the Z/AA hexrow area. Fortunately, in turn 2 they were slowed up thanks to some troop repositioning, accurate shooting and gobs of residual. In the end, this delay proved just enough as the Allied turn 3 reinforcements were able to get positioned. The Germans called off the attack in the bottom of turn 4 after their DFF was ineffective and dislodging the Allies from another VC building appeared unlikely.

Highly recommended for a fun, well-balanced (now 9-11 on ROAR), fast-playing scenario. Thanks to John for an enjoyable game.

Final positions
View attachment 27346
This scenario is the next up for me to play in my next FtF game.

Looking forward to it.

von Marwitz
 

von Marwitz

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Stand and Die, WCW 10

The title is false advertising. My opponent (the Japanese) may have discovered a flaw in this scenario that deflated the fun factor for both of us. Since this is pre-1938 (December 1937), No Quarter (G18.7) is NOT in effect and Chinese KMT troops can surrender. Given double CVP for captured units, the Japanese have more incentive to capture Chinese squads (4 CVP each) than buildings, one prisoner squad is worth as much as 4-hex building! Similarly, the Chinese gun and AFV are each a CVP bonanza if captured. So, the Japanese need not banzai, but rather just use their MMGs, mortars, and AFV to gang up on one squad per turn to reap huge CVP rewards via capture without any need for substantial territorial gains. The scenario also has some historicity issues worth noting.

In our game, Japan came on strong along their right (the Chinese left) to target gaps in the jungle and bamboo at 24CC9 and FF7; the KMT had three squads nearby with an ATR and LMG on defense. Chinese defensive fire immediately knocked out a zippy TE-KE (with an ATR) and KIA-ed one Japanese squad. A single Japanese platoon entered center south to take the (empty) board 35 hamlet. The Chinese left flank then retreated in good order to better cover while half the Chinese armor, including the 20mm MAs, rumbled to the 24CC9 gap area to establish over watch, but none of that mattered.

Japanese armor drove right through Chinese covered arcs and laughed as rounds missed or bounced off. Then the Japanese stopped, fired, and killed the Chinese armor. But, even if the armor battle was a wash, with equal losses to both sides, that would have been ok for Japan as they pursued their core strategy of capturing one Chinese squad at a time. They just picked the nearest KMT squad and ganged up on it with 75% of the Japanese OB using MMGs and mortars to break the target and then seal route paths while one infantry element moved adjacent. Copious smoke certainly helped, but the root problem is double CVP for captured units. The Japanese never advanced further than 10 hexes from the board edge since by then (turn five) they had racked up more VP than the Chinese by winning the armor battle, capturing three squads, and taking the eight outlying buildings, which the Chinese cannot afford to defend for fear of getting captured. The Chinese still had their 9-2 leader, seven GO squads, three AFVs, and their gun as well as unchallenged control of the central village on board 24 with its 20 VP bounty, but essentially lost the game because three squads got taken prisoner, rather than KIA.

None of that reflected “Stand and Die.” And the Japanese had zero incentive to “assault the last Chinese defenses surrounding Shanghai.” Instead, they just nibbled at the edges in a really slow game that covered only a small fraction of the map board.

On historicity, the scenario seems to conflate the battles of Shanghai and Nanjing because it refers to Shanghai and Chapei without ever mentioning Nanjing even though the circumstances actually match the Nanjing campaign. The scenario claims to be set in Shanghai on December 7, but the fighting for Shanghai ended in November, just as the fighting for Nanjing was picking up. The scenario refers to “Chapei Province,” but there is no such province anywhere in China; “Chapei” was an urban district of Shanghai that was in rubble at the time of this scenario, no rice paddies or wide open spaces like on the map. The PzK IAs of the “3rd armored battalion” presented in the scenario never fought in Shanghai, but rather Nanjing, see Chinese vehicle note 3 on page H101. And the aftermath says “within five days the Japanese then smashed their way into the city itself,” again that’s Nanjing which is not mentioned in the write up. The Japanese were, however, in central Shanghai (and Chabei) in August. And so on and so forth.
Well, I played this scenario twice as the Chinese and won both games. One playing was just recently at GRENADIER. I might have been lucky, but at least in my playings many Chinese captured squads were not the issue. The Chinese did a pretty good job nibbling away the Japanese armor instead, using everything from their own armor, the Gun, the ATR and MGs for the purpose.

von Marwitz
 

Carln0130

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Stand and Die, WCW 10

The title is false advertising. My opponent (the Japanese) may have discovered a flaw in this scenario that deflated the fun factor for both of us. Since this is pre-1938 (December 1937), No Quarter (G18.7) is NOT in effect and Chinese KMT troops can surrender. Given double CVP for captured units, the Japanese have more incentive to capture Chinese squads (4 CVP each) than buildings, one prisoner squad is worth as much as 4-hex building! Similarly, the Chinese gun and AFV are each a CVP bonanza if captured. So, the Japanese need not banzai, but rather just use their MMGs, mortars, and AFV to gang up on one squad per turn to reap huge CVP rewards via capture without any need for substantial territorial gains. The scenario also has some historicity issues worth noting.

In our game, Japan came on strong along their right (the Chinese left) to target gaps in the jungle and bamboo at 24CC9 and FF7; the KMT had three squads nearby with an ATR and LMG on defense. Chinese defensive fire immediately knocked out a zippy TE-KE (with an ATR) and KIA-ed one Japanese squad. A single Japanese platoon entered center south to take the (empty) board 35 hamlet. The Chinese left flank then retreated in good order to better cover while half the Chinese armor, including the 20mm MAs, rumbled to the 24CC9 gap area to establish over watch, but none of that mattered.

Japanese armor drove right through Chinese covered arcs and laughed as rounds missed or bounced off. Then the Japanese stopped, fired, and killed the Chinese armor. But, even if the armor battle was a wash, with equal losses to both sides, that would have been ok for Japan as they pursued their core strategy of capturing one Chinese squad at a time. They just picked the nearest KMT squad and ganged up on it with 75% of the Japanese OB using MMGs and mortars to break the target and then seal route paths while one infantry element moved adjacent. Copious smoke certainly helped, but the root problem is double CVP for captured units. The Japanese never advanced further than 10 hexes from the board edge since by then (turn five) they had racked up more VP than the Chinese by winning the armor battle, capturing three squads, and taking the eight outlying buildings, which the Chinese cannot afford to defend for fear of getting captured. The Chinese still had their 9-2 leader, seven GO squads, three AFVs, and their gun as well as unchallenged control of the central village on board 24 with its 20 VP bounty, but essentially lost the game because three squads got taken prisoner, rather than KIA.

None of that reflected “Stand and Die.” And the Japanese had zero incentive to “assault the last Chinese defenses surrounding Shanghai.” Instead, they just nibbled at the edges in a really slow game that covered only a small fraction of the map board.

On historicity, the scenario seems to conflate the battles of Shanghai and Nanjing because it refers to Shanghai and Chapei without ever mentioning Nanjing even though the circumstances actually match the Nanjing campaign. The scenario claims to be set in Shanghai on December 7, but the fighting for Shanghai ended in November, just as the fighting for Nanjing was picking up. The scenario refers to “Chapei Province,” but there is no such province anywhere in China; “Chapei” was an urban district of Shanghai that was in rubble at the time of this scenario, no rice paddies or wide open spaces like on the map. The PzK IAs of the “3rd armored battalion” presented in the scenario never fought in Shanghai, but rather Nanjing, see Chinese vehicle note 3 on page H101. And the aftermath says “within five days the Japanese then smashed their way into the city itself,” again that’s Nanjing which is not mentioned in the write up. The Japanese were, however, in central Shanghai (and Chabei) in August. And so on and so forth.
Fore-warned is fore-armed. This scenario was a tournament staple back in the day. It was also pretty balanced despite people being aware of the fact that the Chinese could still be taken prisoner.
 

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Ya it is not as bad as that one guy makes it out to be. As for info on the scenario backround, ya gotta remember I designed this back in 1990 or around that time so info was not as readly available as it is now. I did get this action from a book by Steven Zologa called Armor in the Pacific.

Anyway, glad to see people are still enjoying this old chesnut. Sadly, I think I am the only one still playing ASL out of all the people that designed those WCW scenarios.

Well, I played this scenario twice as the Chinese and won both games. One playing was just recently at GRENADIER. I might have been lucky, but at least in my playings many Chinese captured squads were not the issue. The Chinese did a pretty good job nibbling away the Japanese armor instead, using everything from their own armor, the Gun, the ATR and MGs for the purpose.

von Marwitz
 
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