Happy New Year and Thanks for the Past 20 Years

Pitman

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Well, 2021 is upon us. I had assumed we would have jetpacks by now, and sexy robots who would make our moves for us without knocking over stacks. Oh, well.

I hope 2021 is better for the ASL world than 2020 was. Thanks to missing Winter Offensive for work and health reasons early in the year and thanks to the 'rona shutting everything down, I did not play a single scenario of ASL last year, which is quite dismaying. I hope that doesn't last--I look forward to more ftf play in the future.

As well as looking forward, I can also look back, because it was 20 years ago this month that I mark my introduction into the ASL world. That requires a word of clarification--I had played Squad Leader way back in the day, starting in 1980 or 1981. I was in college when ASL came out and couldn't afford to re-buy the system. During the 1990s, though, I slowly began to get ASL modules. I read through the rules and even did a couple scenarios over the years but it wasn't until the 2nd Edition rulebook came out in early 2001 that a friend of mine--Jeff Seiken--and I decided to commit ourselves to really learning and playing the game. And we did--opening up a whole new world for me. So that is why I mark early 2001 as my "anniversary," even though it wasn't my first introduction.

Of course, I wish I had gotten into it much earlier. I sometimes think of all the games I missed! But tactical wargames have never really appealed to me (operational level was always my favorite level), so it wasn't very likely. ASL is an odd exception for me that took over much of my life!

Nevertheless, the past 20 years have brought much enjoyment for me (along with a little pain, including one wrecked car thanks to ASL). I've gotten to meet and interact with hundreds of people, made some genuine long-term friends, and got to do all sorts of things, including playtesting & development, design, website creation, self-publishing, article writing, tournament running, and much more.

ASL had me going places I never thought I'd go--and I'm not even referring to hotel basements in Cleveland. Who knew I'd be buying felt at craft shops and fishing tackle at sporting good stores and tweezers from medical supply places and precision dice from some guy up in Canada. Who knew I would be purchasing scanners and laminators and tile spacers and banker boxes and dice towers and sewing thread? Who knew I'd begin bathing naked in a bathtub full of counters?

I couldn't possibly mention everybody I've encountered during this decades-long journey, but I do want to mention a few to whom I owe particular debts.

Obviously, I have to start with thanking Jeff Seiken for helping me get on the ASL bandwagon in the first place.

I want to thank some of the people I regularly played with in Columbus in those early days, who helped me get my "fix," including Kenn, Jim, and Matt, especially.

I want to thank Mark Nixon and Wild Bill for being so welcoming to me at my first ASLOK in October 2001. From the moment I walked in the door, Mark Nixon made me feel like I actually belonged there with everybody else. I'd also like to thank Bret Hildebran for so many other great ASLOKs.

I want to thank everybody I played at that first ASLOK, including the guy who said, "Now I'm going to show you something called 'vehicle sleaze.'"

I want to thank Sam Belcher for my very first dice tower!

I want to especially thank the Northern Kentucky-Southern Ohio ASLers, the first playing group I was able to join. In particular, I'd like to acknowledge Rod Callen, Ron Bonear, Russ & Russ, Stan Jackson and Mike Malloy. I will always be indebted to Ron for giving me an opportunity to win a game by immobilizing a Tiger in CC with a single leader.

I also want to thank P. J. Norton for his many Officefests and Museumfests.

I want to thank the hundreds of ASLers who have played me over the years, especially all those who taught me something while they kicked my ass.

I want to thank Steve Dethlefsen, for giving a newbie scenario designer a chance and publishing his scenario pack.

I want to thank Brian Youse and Perry Cocke (and later Chas Argent as well) for publishing Few Returned and many ASL articles, as well as for putting up with me generally.

I want to thank Evan Sherry and all the Schwerpunkt guys (esp. Mike F., Brian, Hugh, and Mike A.), not only for publishing Ruins of the Reich but also for welcoming me in general and feeding my fat face at many an ASLOK.

I'd like to thank everybody who purchased the Scenario Designers Guide as well as everybody who has used the Desperation Morale website. I'd especially like to thank those people over the years who have been generous enough to contribute towards the maintenance and continuation of the site.

I know there are many other people I should thank by name as well, including some who I will probably hit my head against the wall for forgetting, but I guess that's maybe the point--there have been so, so many people who, in so many different ways, have made ASL so enjoyable for me for the past 20 years.

I don't know what life has in store for me in the future but I hope ASL stays a part of it while it lasts.

Thanks. And please be happy--AND SAFE--in 2021.
 

cathmor01

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Thanks Mark. Desperation Morale has been extremely helpful to me over the years as I’ve grown my ASL collection and dived ever deeper into the hobby.

I wish you and my fellow gamers a happy new year, more ftf games and a safe/healthy 2021.
 

Vic Provost

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Well, 2021 is upon us. I had assumed we would have jetpacks by now, and sexy robots who would make our moves for us without knocking over stacks. Oh, well.

I hope 2021 is better for the ASL world than 2020 was. Thanks to missing Winter Offensive for work and health reasons early in the year and thanks to the 'rona shutting everything down, I did not play a single scenario of ASL last year, which is quite dismaying. I hope that doesn't last--I look forward to more ftf play in the future.

As well as looking forward, I can also look back, because it was 20 years ago this month that I mark my introduction into the ASL world. That requires a word of clarification--I had played Squad Leader way back in the day, starting in 1980 or 1981. I was in college when ASL came out and couldn't afford to re-buy the system. During the 1990s, though, I slowly began to get ASL modules. I read through the rules and even did a couple scenarios over the years but it wasn't until the 2nd Edition rulebook came out in early 2001 that a friend of mine--Jeff Seiken--and I decided to commit ourselves to really learning and playing the game. And we did--opening up a whole new world for me. So that is why I mark early 2001 as my "anniversary," even though it wasn't my first introduction.

Of course, I wish I had gotten into it much earlier. I sometimes think of all the games I missed! But tactical wargames have never really appealed to me (operational level was always my favorite level), so it wasn't very likely. ASL is an odd exception for me that took over much of my life!

Nevertheless, the past 20 years have brought much enjoyment for me (along with a little pain, including one wrecked car thanks to ASL). I've gotten to meet and interact with hundreds of people, made some genuine long-term friends, and got to do all sorts of things, including playtesting & development, design, website creation, self-publishing, article writing, tournament running, and much more.

ASL had me going places I never thought I'd go--and I'm not even referring to hotel basements in Cleveland. Who knew I'd be buying felt at craft shops and fishing tackle at sporting good stores and tweezers from medical supply places and precision dice from some guy up in Canada. Who knew I would be purchasing scanners and laminators and tile spacers and banker boxes and dice towers and sewing thread? Who knew I'd begin bathing naked in a bathtub full of counters?

I couldn't possibly mention everybody I've encountered during this decades-long journey, but I do want to mention a few to whom I owe particular debts.

Obviously, I have to start with thanking Jeff Seiken for helping me get on the ASL bandwagon in the first place.

I want to thank some of the people I regularly played with in Columbus in those early days, who helped me get my "fix," including Kenn, Jim, and Matt, especially.

I want to thank Mark Nixon and Wild Bill for being so welcoming to me at my first ASLOK in October 2001. From the moment I walked in the door, Mark Nixon made me feel like I actually belonged there with everybody else. I'd also like to thank Bret Hildebran for so many other great ASLOKs.

I want to thank everybody I played at that first ASLOK, including the guy who said, "Now I'm going to show you something called 'vehicle sleaze.'"

I want to thank Sam Belcher for my very first dice tower!

I want to especially thank the Northern Kentucky-Southern Ohio ASLers, the first playing group I was able to join. In particular, I'd like to acknowledge Rod Callen, Ron Bonear, Russ & Russ, Stan Jackson and Mike Malloy. I will always be indebted to Ron for giving me an opportunity to win a game by immobilizing a Tiger in CC with a single leader.

I also want to thank P. J. Norton for his many Officefests and Museumfests.

I want to thank the hundreds of ASLers who have played me over the years, especially all those who taught me something while they kicked my ass.

I want to thank Steve Dethlefsen, for giving a newbie scenario designer a chance and publishing his scenario pack.

I want to thank Brian Youse and Perry Cocke (and later Chas Argent as well) for publishing Few Returned and many ASL articles, as well as for putting up with me generally.

I want to thank Evan Sherry and all the Schwerpunkt guys (esp. Mike F., Brian, Hugh, and Mike A.), not only for publishing Ruins of the Reich but also for welcoming me in general and feeding my fat face at many an ASLOK.

I'd like to thank everybody who purchased the Scenario Designers Guide as well as everybody who has used the Desperation Morale website. I'd especially like to thank those people over the years who have been generous enough to contribute towards the maintenance and continuation of the site.

I know there are many other people I should thank by name as well, including some who I will probably hit my head against the wall for forgetting, but I guess that's maybe the point--there have been so, so many people who, in so many different ways, have made ASL so enjoyable for me for the past 20 years.

I don't know what life has in store for me in the future but I hope ASL stays a part of it while it lasts.

Thanks. And please be happy--AND SAFE--in 2021.
Thanks Mark for all you do for the hobby, the bottom line is your website has enhanced what we do and is a great resource for us.

Let's hope for a much better 2021, especially later this year when we all might be able to roll 'real' dice in the hobby again.

Happy New Year! Take care and be safe and well, your ASL Comrade, Vic.
 

johnl

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Mark

Thank you for all you've done for the hobby and for your wonderful website. I have used it many times to research products and even to get my collection somewhat organized.

Good luck and roll low

JohnL
 

JoeArthur

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"Nevertheless, the past 20 years have brought much enjoyment for me (along with a little pain, including one wrecked car thanks to ASL). "

Hey! Thought it was just me. I totalled mine driving to the airport to get the plane to Copenhagen.

What amused me was the first person to turn up was an off duty policeman on his way to work who called in to explain why he would be late. "No there's no smell of alcohol" were some of his first words into the phone............

Still made the tourny 👍
 

Pitman

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"Nevertheless, the past 20 years have brought much enjoyment for me (along with a little pain, including one wrecked car thanks to ASL). "

Hey! Thought it was just me. I totalled mine driving to the airport to get the plane to Copenhagen.

What amused me was the first person to turn up was an off duty policeman on his way to work who called in to explain why he would be late. "No there's no smell of alcohol" were some of his first words into the phone............

Still made the tourny 👍
I made my event, too--but it was DETROIT, not COPENHAGEN, so now I want a re-do.
 

pj norton

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I made my event, too--but it was DETROIT, not COPENHAGEN, so now I want a re-do.
Mark, I totally forgot about your accident on the way to Officefest. BTW we still have the chairs you gifted us, one of them is in my gaming room here at my house and the others are in Trents basement.
 
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