Chess Ratings

kcdusk

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At what chess rating do you move from beginer to "proficient", or whatever the next level is after newb?

Are there like levels which clasify new/beginer/very good/master etc ...
 

2054172

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good question, I would like to know also, maybe Scott or Lurker could inform us?:smoke:
 

Lurker

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good question, I would like to know also, maybe Scott or Lurker could inform us?:smoke:
Keep in mind that OTB (over the board) ratings are different from internet ratings. As far as I'm concerned you can pretty much toss these internet club ratings out the window. There is the opportunity to use databases (legally) in on-line tourneys and chess playing programs (illegally), so a comparison to OTB is quite different where DB and reference material is not allowed and you are completely on your own.

From http://www.jaderiver.com/chess/ratings.html near the bottom of the page.


National US Amateur Classes
  • National Class A (USCF 1800- 1999)
    top amateur class
  • National Class B (USCF 1600-1799)
    above average tournament player
  • National Class C (USCF 1400-1599)
    average tournament player
  • National Class D (USCF 1200-1399)
    a strong social player
  • National Class E (USCF 1000-1199)
    social/scholastic players
  • National Class F (USCF 800-999)
    novice/scholastic players
  • National Class G (USCF 600-799)
    beginner II/scholastic players
  • National Class H (USCF 400-599)
    beginner I/scholastic players
  • National Class I (USCF 200-399)
    early beginner/scholastic players
  • National Class J (USCF 100-199)
    minimum rating
 

2054172

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so would player in say, class A ever play player in class F if there was a real tourney?
 

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so would player in say, class A ever play player in class F if there was a real tourney?
Possibly.
Tourneys over the board are usually divided up into player categories, such as
Open - open to all and this is where the Grandmasters enter;
Under 2200
under 2000
under 1800
under 1600
etc.

Not every tourney will have all of these categories. Usually the large tournaments will have them but smaller ones may have something like Under 2200, Under 1800 and Open or something like that.

It all depends on who enters what section.
 

Scott Tortorice

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I have nothing to add here. :laugh: Lurker is now officially the proconsul of our Chess subforum. Or would you prefer 'warmaster'? Just don't start any heresies....:)
 

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Lurker lurker he's our man if he can't do it no one can!:hurray::bounce::hurray::bounce::hurray:
 

kcdusk

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Even playing chess like in our tourney, i never look at books or databases or analyse positions in Chessmaster. I just look at each position, maybe replay the last 3 moves, then make my move in about 20 seconds or so ... before moving on to the next game.

Looking at positions in a book or in a database ... thats legal, right?

Obviously running analysis of a position in CM or something would be illegal, right?
 

2054172

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Even playing chess like in our tourney, i never look at books or databases or analyse positions in Chessmaster. I just look at each position, maybe replay the last 3 moves, then make my move in about 20 seconds or so ... before moving on to the next game.

Looking at positions in a book or in a database ... thats legal, right?

Obviously running analysis of a position in CM or something would be illegal, right?
Right on both accounts I believe.:smoke:
 

Scott Tortorice

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That's correct. The only thing that is illegal is consulting some other intelligence for a move, such as a computer engine or another player. Chess is a bookworm's game so feel free to consult as many books as you want. :)

Generally, I only consult an openings book if a game enters unfamiliar waters, be even then I am sure to reason out my move first and then consult a book to see if I am on the right track.

I do, however, make liberal use of the analysis board. I like to check out the implications of my move candidates as much as possible...usually at least three plys deep. If it is an especially complex position, I might even ruminate on a possible move for a day or so.

You'd be surprised how a little effort on the analysis board can save you lots of points!
 

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I usually set up the position on my board and test numerous variations before I'm comfortable with a complex situation. Opening books and databases are good for standard openings, but once you leave the book lines then you are on your own.
 

Scott Tortorice

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True. That is why even if a particular opening is highly recommended, I will not use it unless I understand the strategy behind it. I've gotten into plenty of trouble by blindly following a particular opening even though I didn't understand the underlying principles.
 

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True. That is why even if a particular opening is highly recommended, I will not use it unless I understand the strategy behind it. I've gotten into plenty of trouble by blindly following a particular opening even though I didn't understand the underlying principles.
You can see that sometimes in on-line tourneys where an opponent is making perfect 'book' moves in a well known opening; as soon as the games leaves book lines the moves become weaker and not in the spirit of that particular line, and often ending with errors.
 

john2054

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my rating is 1400 on playchess . com slow. i consider myself quite good with the theory of chess, and less time for the tactics!
 
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