RO 3 Defenders of Stalingrad Setup Question

aloha_brian

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Martin Shop Garrison setup is within 2 hexes of V23/X21. Does that mean setup within 2 hexes of V23 and/or X21; or does it mean setup within 2 hexes of both V23 and X21?

Brian
 

sfcmikej

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So as usual, and as per the rule book "and/or" is to be interpreted as "and, and or, or". We can make it more interesting by introducing the concept of Boolean operators and exclusivity.
 

Paul M. Weir

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So as usual, and as per the rule book "and/or" is to be interpreted as "and, and or, or". We can make it more interesting by introducing the concept of Boolean operators and exclusivity.
I've always thought that English usage of "and" and "or" to the pedant's booby trap.

Hopefully first rulebooks, then manuals and eventually literature will embrace NOT, AND, OR, XOR and EQV. :devilish:
 

Philippe D.

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Whenever precise language is necessary (examples include mathematics, computer science, and rulebooks), "or" should be understood to be inclusive: "A or B" means that at least one (and possibly both) of A and B is true. In practice the ASLRB tends to use "and/or" whenever "or" would be perfectly fine. The exclusive "or" of restaurant menus, which actually means "not both" (usually, if the set menu says "chicken OR beef", the restaurant owner is fine with you if you don't want either; all he cares about is that he doesn't have to serve both without you paying extra) - well, the exclusive "or" should be reserved for restaurant menus.

(Note, though, that this is not the only point of logic that produces results that are confusing to many. "Students who fail at the written OR the oral exam will have to take an additional exam" is usually well understood to mean that students who fail both exams will have to take the additional exam; but then, the set of students who have to take said additional exam includes those who fail at the written exam, AND those who fail at the oral exam.)

(Also, note that when the index definition of "/" is expanded, recursion doesn't end, and the world explodes in a puff of logic: / means and / or, which expands to and and / or or, which expands to and and and / or or or, ad libitum.)
 
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