Which of these will be most likely published next?

Bob Walters

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It was the incorporation of the desert rules into the module that lead me to feel that including the Commonwealth would be appropriate. Besides not having the British takes a big hole out of the war. I got WoA fairly cheap on eBay but not everyone is that lucky.
 

Yuri0352

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[QUOTE="]
I'm not PC-ing any one but some how I don't think the Japaneses thought of them-self's as 'Japs". What nickname did they give to them-self's or were called by their allies that was not derogatory[/QUOTE]

Assuming that by mentioning 'Japanese ', you are referring to the members of the Imperial Japanese military. Stereotypes notwithstanding, I have neither read nor heard of any evidence that the emperor's fighting men ever referred to themselves by a marginally humorous, self-applied nickname. Nicknames, for the most part would imply that there is some sort of a sense of humor on the part of the participants/recipients. Sense of humor is a characteristic which in my opinion, would rarely if ever be associated with the members of the Imperial Japanese armed forces of the 1920's-40's.
There is certainly a preponderance of evidence to support this view.
 

Nineteen Kilo

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Americans were Yanks, British were Tommy's German's landsers (sp?)
So what was the nick name for Italian soldier? and for that matter what were the, let us say, none offensive nicknames for troops of all the nations.
I'm not PC-ing any one but some how I don't think the Japaneses thought of them-self's as 'Japs". What nickname did they give to them-self's or were called by their allies that was not derogatory

Were the French infantry still Poilu's in WW2 or was that term out of fashion by the second go around?
 

von Marwitz

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The only really non derogatory name for Germans was, I think, jerries.
I think what he is looking for is how they nicknamed themselves and not now they were nicknamed by their adversaries.

Landsers for the Germans would be correct in that line.

von Marwitz
 

Robin Reeve

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Frog was used a lot but that is somewhat derogatory.
The French certainly didn't use that nickname for themselves and it is clearly insulting.
Poilus is rather linked to WW1.
Trouffions, Pousse-cailloux or Biffins are popular words for soldiers, in French.
 

daniel zucker

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Thanks to all let me clarify. I should not apply our standards of language to what was used in war times. I was interested because of the talk about renaming modules, but MMP kept "Yanks" as that doesn't seem to be a sler. And if it was used as such it didn't carry much sting, because in WWI us Americans all sang a song that proudly proclaimed "The Yanks are coming, and we won't be back 'till it's over, over there"
So how did other nations soldiers refer to them-self's and/or how were they referred to by other combatants. I think that; again taking the Japanese; the use of Gaikokujin was probably who they referred to everyone else, Maybe calling europeans 'round eye's' or "hairi apes" was about as nasty as I can think they got, I just don't know.
I had forgot about the French, but I didn't think that "Poilus" was a insult. If so please enlighten me.

BTW: I think 'Yuri0352" is right about a "Sense of humor is a characteristic which in my opinion, would rarely if ever be associated with the members of the Imperial Japanese armed forces..."
 

Brian W

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I think for the most part US (army) soldiers referred to themselves as GIs, not Yanks, and US marines, as gyrenes.
 

jrv

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You don't get to give yourself a nickname.
Landsers were used by the Germans about themselves, I think. I think it's a little like "grunts" now (which I don't think was current during WWII). I don't think the Americans referred to themselves as "yank," although it was the name of the enlisted men's periodical. I think the American's referred to themselves as G.I.s in a similar way that the Germans used landsers (this is a pretty interesting collection of American WWII slang: http://www.artofmanliness.com/2015/07/31/wwii-slang/). "Dogface" also. I don't know what any of the other armies used. Perhaps squaddies for the British, although that might be later. "P.B.I." Here is some British slang: http://www.wakefieldfhs.org.uk/War Slang.htm. I am sure the other nations had their own "in" speak.

JR
 

klasmalmstrom

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Difficulty of movement and a concentration on assaulting heights. I was hoping on a beach landing board or other terrain in Korea.
So you are worried that all/most/too-many of the KW scenarios will include these new boards and be about assault heights?
 

Carln0130

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Difficulty of movement and a concentration on assaulting heights. I was hoping on a beach landing board or other terrain in Korea.
When I got a look some years back, the scenarios seemed like a very good mix to me. Given that is one of the things that get looked at when compiling scenarios for a module and this is not MMP's first rodeo, you should get a good mix. If this was a dedicated HASL to just one battle, then of course the focus would be a lot tighter. This module is covering 3 years of war. I think you are safe.
 

Rindis

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Going back a page, I would think the new Italian/Desert module would be Hollow Legions III, not 'II'. MMP already reprinted it 'straight' and called it 2nd edition some years ago.
 
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