what is the thickness of scenario card stock?

21Z5M

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above says it all.

Also I know everything in the world is moving to digital but has anyone put all their scenarios on card stock?

thanks

Keith
 

62nd Army

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Keith

I tried this approach at first, gave up on it. Card stock more is expensive and heavier in binders.

For scenarios I scan and print standard copy paper is the way to go IMO. I guess
it really is a matter of preference for each.

I have tons of scenarios at the club, having them organized in binders to me is still
better than going thru a file on a computer to pick a scenario to
play for the afternoon. Just take it out of the binder and play, no printing, etc.
Again my personal preference.

Good luck with what ever approach you choose.

Regards
Joe
 

Paul M. Weir

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For so long I gathered my scenario cards into a small number of ASL shallow boxes (Paratrooper, Partisan, etc) with a a box each for core, HASL, AP, General and Annual scenarios, followed by quite a few years when I did nothing with Journals. By about 2009 I started to scan any new stuff and gradually worked my way through my back log.

I use my scans when selecting scenarios. The core, AP and HASL ones went into the existing box collections for safe storage., the non-CH TPP stuff have their own boxes, the SP (SP & RP) still in their original plastic envelopes in own box. I did print off a small number of scans on light card, ASL 122, the VoTG and FB ones that came in Journals have been added in with the associated core and HASL collections as they have the same sequence numbers, but they were the only ones. MMP's Journal and HoB's RbF scenarios remain in their original magazines.

The paper and card originals are kept safely and will be rarely handled, working with scans on my laptop I find is far faster in finding what I want. I have arranged the files by a directory tree eg FB 12 is in "C:\Users\Paul M. Weir\Pictures\My ASL\Scenarios\Multi Man Publishing\Historical\Festung Budapest" in files named "MMP FB 12 a.jpg" and "MMP FB 12 b.jpg" for the 2 sides and both with Title of "The Black Ravens Are Flying" and Date Taken of "05/02/1945 01:00:00" (Title and Date Taken are metadata fields that Windows recognises). While HASL have their own directory, contiguous series like Annuals, Journals, APs, WOs, core (MMP) or similar (LFT, BFP, SP, RP) each are in their own single directories. I keep mine as ".jpg" files as Title and Date Taken are supported by Windows for these files while not (under Vista or earlier at least) for ".pdf". "jpg" files are fairly universal anyway.

When I finish my backlog (1985 pages done, 224 to do) I intend setting up a theatre directory tree where I will place shortcuts to the original image files. So at the moment I can select by producer, producer code, title, action date (or range). I will be able to select by theatre in the future.

I don't bother printing out when I have selected a scenario, I just read from the screen. So at the cost of a little staring at the screen and zooming in, there is no paper to print, worry about or get damaged. I have so many that they outweigh and out bulk my laptop. A lot of work scanning and adding the attributes but I feel well worth the effort, even for a solo dilettante ASLer like me.
 

Randy Strader

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above says it all.

Also I know everything in the world is moving to digital but has anyone put all their scenarios on card stock?

thanks

Keith
When I photocopy my dividers to bind into my spiral rulebooks at FedEx-Kinkos, I ask for "32 weight cardstock" and whatever they hand me seems pretty close -- a little more glossy than MMP-printed scenarios but not as glossy as Schwerpunkt or FrF scenarios. HTH.
 

MAS01

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I believe that cardstock is 80lb weight. After scanning, I printed the rulebook out on 32lb matte paper (picked up at Kinko's). It's pretty close to actual rulebook paper.
 

Randy Strader

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I believe that cardstock is 80lb weight. After scanning, I printed the rulebook out on 32lb matte paper (picked up at Kinko's). It's pretty close to actual rulebook paper.
Right, I think i got my wires crossed. 32lb is as you described -- a little thicker than regular paper but good for copying RB paper. 80lb is, as you mention, the correct card-stock weight.
 

RandyT0001

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The cards that I have appear to be 65lb cardstock which is about 0.0078 inches thick. Office Depot sells Neenah Bright White 65lb. (175g/sqm) cardstock, 250 sheets for about $17. I make copies of scenarios on 28lb (Laser Printer) bond paper. It is thicker than 24lb bond paper and rarely will any type or image show through.
 

clubby

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I use 80lb for everything. I have "replaced" all the old yellowed scenario cards by scanning them and cleaning them up with photoshop, essentially removing all the yellow and sharpening up the print. I then print them out on 80lb and store them in binders.

I also change all the weird euro sized LFT stuff to normal US size card stock and put the originals away.
 

BattleSchool

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I also change all the weird euro sized LFT stuff to normal US size card stock and put the originals away.
Or you could change all the weird, North American-sized stuff to international standards used in the rest of the world. ;)

On a more serious note, have you had trouble printing 80lb paper using a colour laser printer? Past experience usually resulted in smeared ink. It appears that many printers do not support heavy card stock, and where they do, they require manual feeding.
 

MAS01

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Chris:

I use the color laser printer I have at work (perk of being the plant manager) and do not have any issues. But, it is an office sized unit not a home unit.


Mark
 

clubby

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I print them on my old reliable HP D6400 inkjet printer. I also misspoke about what I use. I use Neenah 67lb vellum 94 bright white. I find it very similar to what's used originally. $5.99 for 250 sheets at amazon.
 

BattleSchool

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Chris:

I use the color laser printer I have at work (perk of being the plant manager) and do not have any issues. But, it is an office sized unit not a home unit.

Mark
Thanks Mark.

I had no joy with my last HP MFP. Have not tried with my newish Canon MF8580Cdw, which is purportedly an "office machine." But then, so was my last HP, and it mangled the card stock and consistently smeared the ink.

I haven't used anything more demanding than 32lb paper to date. Maybe I ought to give it a try. Although these days it could be cheaper to print at Staples given the cost of the Canon ink cartridges. When I factor in the cost of 32lb paper, it costs me about 21 cents (US)/per sheet (one sided) to print at home.
 

RandyT0001

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Virtually all home and small office printers max out at 32lb bond paper. The feed rollers are set to a specific thickness so that 20lb, 24lb, and 28lb bond paper feeds automatically into inkjet printers. Laser printers max out at 32lb bond paper and usually have to be fed manually into the machine. If you try to feed heavier stock paper into the machine most of the time it feeds intermittently and the ink smears. If it does feed into the printer without the smears, the gap of printer's feed rollers are being forced wider and later, after printing scores of scenarios on cardstock paper the printer stops feeding normal 20lb and 24lb paper. Being out of alignment with the gears to rotate them, the feed rollers begin to jam more often.
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von Marwitz

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A word from the "rest of the world"...

I have recently been using DIN-A-4 of 160g/m².

This seems to be somewhat lighter than 65lb which has been mentioned above, while the stuff 'officially' used seems to be 80lb.

The difference of the 'official' 80lb paper to DIN-A-4 of 160g/m² is noticable but the latter appears thick enough to me. I have not encountered any difficulties with standard printers with regard to smearing or anything.

von Marwitz
 

BattleSchool

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A word from the "rest of the world"...

I have recently been using DIN-A-4 of 160g/m².

This seems to be somewhat lighter than 65lb which has been mentioned above, while the stuff 'officially' used seems to be 80lb.

The difference of the 'official' 80lb paper to DIN-A-4 of 160g/m² is noticable but the latter appears thick enough to me. I have not encountered any difficulties with standard printers with regard to smearing or anything.

von Marwitz
The DIN is deafening, another plot to take over the world, one industry standard at a time. ;)

I don't know what the equivalent is in bond weight, but it would appear that you are using a very "light" card stock similar to the 67lb Vellum Bristol that Clubby is using. I have not used this used weight, but it appears to be compatible with most printers.
 

Bob Walters

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Or you could change all the weird, North American-sized stuff to international standards used in the rest of the world. ;)

On a more serious note, have you had trouble printing 80lb paper using a colour laser printer? Past experience usually resulted in smeared ink. It appears that many printers do not support heavy card stock, and where they do, they require manual feeding.
Many color laser printers will print card stock. I have an older Dell 3110cn and in the multipurpose tray it will handle up to 80lb cardstock. I have had this for over a decade and it was not particularly expensive when I bought it. Now one can buy them for much much less. A quick look around the net and you can find quite a few that are not expensive that provide good results
 

BattleSchool

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I have a pair of HP laser printers (B/W only) from the 90s in excellent condition that might be worth the effort (albeit not in colour). However, finding drivers and cables that will work with a Mac is a mission in itself. Then there is the matter of the ink cartridges--they may not be serviceable after more than a decade sitting idle.

Me thinks I'll stick with Staples, especially if it is a large job like Elite Canadians. But thanks for the tip just the same.
 
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