What are you currently reading?

witchbottles

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The Structure of Evolutionary Theory
-Stephen Jay Gould
an interesting read

1525011220214.png - we covered this one well in our class " The Human Spirit, Spirituality, and Essence" about 6 months ago.

Have you ever read Durkheim's "Elementary Forms of Religious Life"? Or Margaret Mead's "Sex and Temperament in Three Primitive Societies"? Gould's assertions tend to base from certain theories of social interactionism as one of the three main areas remaining to be explored about how natural selection integrates itself within the realm of the human experience.
 

Dr Zaius

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Bram Stoker's Dracula. I'm ashamed to admit I've never read it, although the story has been told and re-told a thousand times in popular culture.

I have to say, it's really good. It's old school, for sure. But it's also a story that sucks you in really quickly, and there's a lot more nuance to it than what is typically portrayed in Hollywood films.
 

witchbottles

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Bram Stoker's Dracula. I'm ashamed to admit I've never read it, although the story has been told and re-told a thousand times in popular culture.

I have to say, it's really good. It's old school, for sure. But it's also a story that sucks you in really quickly, and there's a lot more nuance to it than what is typically portrayed in Hollywood films.
After reading a few classic works of fiction, you remember why it is that some classical works of fiction remain so popular from generation to generation and are re-made or re-cast into new but familiar roles- like Dracula.. :)
 
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"Ten days to destiny: the battle of Crete" by Kiriakopoulos. (1985). It's old, and it's stylised like a personal account/novelisation. But for all that it gives me valuable information on Greek forces and the Cretan point of view.
 

Sparky

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fabulously detailed book with to die for maps and pictures. Giving it a reread as I gear up to tackling this project again.

Narvik.jpeg
 

witchbottles

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1533693596996.png

A classic - been far too long since I last read Tolstoy - needed a good choice for a 19th-century lit class - hard to beat his brute realism, for finding good example media to build position papers around.
 

Paul M. Weir

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Finished "Persian Fire" by Tom Holland

A non-hardcore history of the pre-Alexander Persian-Greek wars and the roots of the Persian Empire. Still quite detailed and a very readable account. For a small number of readers it will be just a starting for further investigation but for most it will be quite sufficient for that period.

Of course my non-hardcore could be someone else's hardcore.
 

MarkDV

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ADOLF HITLER by John Toland. Ok so it's a book that's 42 years old. But LOTS of interviews, comments from those who knew him. I never knew that the 1920s were so politically chaotic and into the vacuum steps...Adolf....