Today in ASL I ... (Day to day ASL doings)

bprobst

Well-Known Member
Joined
Oct 31, 2003
Messages
1,927
Likes
591
Points
113
Location
Melbourne, Australia
Skype
bruce.w.probst
Damn! :mad:

Now we need to go through about 50,000 threads with roughly 855,000 posts to purge the forum of the expression 'VBM sleaze' and to substitute it with 'VBM tactic'...
Yes, we do. It bugs the heck out of me when people talk about "VBM sleaze" (in a serious manner), like it's some massive cheating action that only cheaters use. It's a tactic fully supported by the rules, and it has several counter-tactics that can be used against it. Too many people use the term "sleaze" in a non-joking fashion when what they mean is "I'm upset that I didn't think of it first".
 

jrv

Vare, legiones redde!
Joined
May 25, 2005
Messages
17,697
Likes
2,915
Points
163
Location
Teutoburger Wald
Yep, I know that they get the free 10%, but as the Japanese were moving across the board to attack, I thought that HIP was irrelevant. (NRBH, but I imagine that entering the board and moving eight or ten hexes would probably result in loss of HIP.)
One can still use it while attacking if set up on board, but perhaps only once. If your opponent doesn't count, you can move "all" your units, and as you move your "last" stacks, your opponent blasts away with everything that can bear. Then you pull out your HIP units and skillfully walk across the board on a path that is restricted from SFF/FPF because of closer units. In some circumstances you can wait for a turn or two to reveal your HIP so that your opponent shifts his forces away from one area of the board.

This is not necessarily a great idea for game play because from now on your opponent is going to count your units, slowing down play.

JR
 

Justiciar

Well-Known Member
Joined
Mar 2, 2008
Messages
4,131
Likes
902
Points
113
Location
Within Range
Yep, I know that they get the free 10%, but as the Japanese were moving across the board to attack, I thought that HIP was irrelevant. (NRBH, but I imagine that entering the board and moving eight or ten hexes would probably result in loss of HIP.)

Also, I understand the distinction of entered and attacking, but being but a novice I often express myself clumsily and incorrectly (but hope that the gist is reasonably clear).
If they set up on board and attack, and for example set these up on your right flank...but then attack enforce on your left, you may well move away units you had on your right to deal with the main attack...the Japanese then break cover and move through the hole/gap to create havoc / exit what have you. That was what I was getting at.
 

djohannsen

Active Member
Joined
Jan 3, 2017
Messages
466
Likes
315
Points
63
Location
Within 2,00 yards
That was what I was getting at.
Solid copy, that you can use the HIP to obfuscate the relative strengths of your attacking disposition. Not something that I would have necessarily thought through on my own. Also, that HIP cannot be used when entering (as in starting off board), is clear as well. It's a tough slog for me, but gradually I hope to learn to play this game.
 

Ganjulama

Tuco B.P.J. Maria Ramirez
Joined
Oct 30, 2003
Messages
1,785
Likes
419
Points
83
Location
Wilmington, NC
Today I booked our hotel room for ASLOK 2018 !

Chris Mazzei and I will arrive on Friday 28 September and will have to be dragged out of there on Monday 8 October.

10 days of ASL goodness.....one of the best weeks of my year, every year. Looking forward to it tremendously.
The Nature Boy approves
 

jrv

Vare, legiones redde!
Joined
May 25, 2005
Messages
17,697
Likes
2,915
Points
163
Location
Teutoburger Wald
I restarted a project to scan my overlays, print copies and laminate those copies for use so that I no longer am at risk of losing the original overlays. In all the years I've owned them I have not (as far as I know) lost one, and have only slight damage to one from a tape accident. But having seen others rip the artwork off theirs, I decided that it would be worthwhile to create backups and not use the originals. This turns out to be a non-trivial amount of work: scanning, cleaning up the scans, generating backs (I like having overlays labeled on the back), printing, cutting, laminating and cutting the lamination. After a bit of trial-and-error, and some deeper learning of gimp than I really wanted to do, I have completed one sheet and have a procedure that should work for the rest. I still have a non-trivial amount of work to do, but at least I now see a path.

JR
 

hongkongwargamer

Feeling like a Russian 76L
Silver Supporting Member
Joined
Apr 4, 2013
Messages
4,657
Likes
1,651
Points
163
Location
17 hexes
I restarted a project to scan my overlays, print copies and laminate those copies for use so that I no longer am at risk of losing the original overlays. In all the years I've owned them I have not (as far as I know) lost one, and have only slight damage to one from a tape accident. But having seen others rip the artwork off theirs, I decided that it would be worthwhile to create backups and not use the originals. This turns out to be a non-trivial amount of work: scanning, cleaning up the scans, generating backs (I like having overlays labeled on the back), printing, cutting, laminating and cutting the lamination. After a bit of trial-and-error, and some deeper learning of gimp than I really wanted to do, I have completed one sheet and have a procedure that should work for the rest. I still have a non-trivial amount of work to do, but at least I now see a path.

JR
I imagine the tricky bit is to print them to the exact right size?
 

jrv

Vare, legiones redde!
Joined
May 25, 2005
Messages
17,697
Likes
2,915
Points
163
Location
Teutoburger Wald
I imagine the tricky bit is to print them to the exact right size?
Not exactly. It is a concern, and you have to tell all the software involved what the scale is and not to scale things from that. I scan the images at 200dpi. At higher resolutions I was seeing artifacts in the scanning. The scan produces a .pnm file, which apparently does not have scale metadata that gimp recognizes, although I could see that it had metadata with resolution_x and resolution_y as 200. gimp was having none of that, and it reported the .pnm file as 72dpi. I tried to find a way to convince gimp that the .pnm file was really 200dpi, but I never figured out how to do it. I then found a command line program (imagemagick) that will perform manipulations on images. This command below converts the .pnm file to a .png file while marking it with the correct resolution and as a bonus, cropping the image from legal size to letter. On the .png gimp somehow finds the correct resolution.

convert overlay-200dpi.pnm -set units PixelsPerInch -density 200 -crop 1700x2200+0+0 overlay-cropped-letter-200dpi.png

"convert" is one of the imagemagick programs. Once the image is loaded in gimp at 200 dpi, gimp doesn't touch that value. I print directly out of gimp, and at that point the printer driver software wanted to scale the image down. The gimp image is 8.5 inches x 11 inches, and the printer driver knows my printer can't print to the full page margins. On the printer dialog for my printer there is one option that says scale which needs to be at 100% and another option that says, "ignore margins". The first time I printed I didn't check this checkbox, and of course the image scaled (very slightly so that it was not noticeable at first). With the checkbox checked everything is as desired. Of course it is important to lay the graphics out so that nothing goes into your printer's "no-print" margins.

If you don't print directly from gimp but instead send the image to a .pdf or some other intermediate software, then you have another piece of software that you have to watch like a hawk. But it isn't tricky; it's usually just a question of finding all the tick boxes and ticking them or unticking them as appropriate. I like printing directly from gimp mostly because I know that it will not change resolution in a surprising manner, once the correct resolution is set.

JR
 
Last edited:
Joined
Aug 10, 2017
Messages
28
Likes
8
Points
3
Location
Indiana
Today, setting up Vierville for my 11 yr old and 13 yr old, I scaped my tweezers across a 7-4-7 counter and defaced it. All I can say is “Air Assault!” (In 1944, “Airborne”.) They’ll live to fight another day minus their hips and bottoms of their magazines!