So what scenarios have you played Recently?

Michael R

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Magnus Rimvall and I finished FT236 ETHNIC CLEANSING. I had the defending NOVJ Partisans. The Partisans are not as hobbled as usual; they can deploy and form multi-location fire groups. The partisans are against Albanians reinforced by Italians. It is always tough to attack with six-morale Italians, but there are a lot of them and the Albanians have a morale of seven. The Axis side has multiple ways to accumulate VP and they have seven turns to do it. My partisans held pretty well, I thought, but after four turns it was obvious the Axis side would win, even though at the time the partisans had more VP through Axis casualties. The balance for the partisans is more weapons, but they need more bodies. The image below is taken when we called it.
8973
 

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Magnus Rimvall and I finished FT236 ETHNIC CLEANSING. I had the defending NOVJ Partisans. The Partisans are not as hobbled as usual; they can deploy and form multi-location fire groups. The partisans are against Albanians reinforced by Italians. It is always tough to attack with six-morale Italians, but there are a lot of them and the Albanians have a morale of seven. The Axis side has multiple ways to accumulate VP and they have seven turns to do it. My partisans held pretty well, I thought, but after four turns it was obvious the Axis side would win, even though at the time the partisans had more VP through Axis casualties. The balance for the partisans is more weapons, but they need more bodies. The image below is taken when we called it.
View attachment 8973
Yeah this scenario looked like a lot of fun until I set it up, whence it became very obvious that the Partisans had no chance. My opponent and I never even played it. I think if the Axis had to take more hexes, or the Allies got VP for locations held it would be a really fun scenario.
 

Steve E7

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I won this as the Partisans easily. The Axis player does not gain VP for inflicting casualties on the Partisans - just don't get your Partisans' captured. On the flip side, the Partisans do get VP for inflicting CVP. I was able to capture Italian squads who got too close, and managed to even KIA an armored car. I wouldn't say its a must play, but it wasn't too bad.
 

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Played BFP-75 Schreiber's Success but ended up calling it halfway through due to some errors on both sides that fundamentally altered the game. I can comment that I feel this one is tough on the Germans. If the Russians use their AT Ditches effectively and play a fallback defense to the village cluster on DW-4a, the Germans are going to find it very slow going. The Germans must cross some ground with little cover. Once in the AT Ditches, the two MF per hex slows things way down. Since the Russians can dictate where the German tanks may go, effective use of their tank reinforcements can also make life tough on the Germans. The first level of hex N3 is a great hex for the 10-2 firegroup as it has good visibility to much of the village and all the AT Ditch hexes. Good scenario marred by some rookie mistakes on both sides. Worth playing but very slow. Be prepared for toppling stacks once the Germans get into the AT Ditches!
 

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Played Broken Bamboo as Japanese with the Rising Sun edition, which adds one Japanese squad compared to the CoB edition. My setup was not well-balanced as i failed to identify where the main thrust of the assault would land. The board 47 stream was an impediment to a speedy repositioning. The Jap HIP traps broadly failed, although the Gurkhas were not very succesful in their CCs too. The endgame saw the relatively unbloodied Gurkha force carefully made its way across the gully to the VC buildings against markedly-weakened opposition. My remnants tried to recapture some buildings on the last turn but the Gurkhas were well-placed to defeat that and the three CC attacks had ratios way too poor to turn the tide.
 
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Blood Brothers BFP HG-16 Burma '45, British Indian troops must capture most of a hilly village from Indian Nationalist troops. (INA) The first hurdle the Indians must deal with is to get across an open gap between 2 hills, all under the guns of the INA. I was held up here, but was able to make progress on the flanks, then SMOKE in the main INA positions. Once in close, the Indians advantage in numbers becomes telling, but a skillful fight and fall back defense required a crossing of the mid board stream against the last of the INA. Down to the last turn, but a (British), Indian victory. Nice scenario.

We played it that no weapon was captured, as both sides are armed with the same SW....
 

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@Matt Boehland and I got a head start on D-Day commemorations yesterday afternoon by putting Pegasus Bridge on the table. Given the subject matter and a desire to get better with Chapter E, there was absolutely no way we couldn't play PB1 Ham and Bloody Jam. For our second scenario, we chose PB3 Piecemeal.

In both cases, I played the British, and Matt played as the Germans.

The results of these playings should be taken with a certain grain of salt, as there was a fair amount of rules overhead (E1., E2., E8., Q, PB SSRs) and I didn't have nearly enough time to internalize it all. This was only my second time playing a night scenario, my first time with gliders, my first time on Pegasus Bridge, and I'd only seen the PB SSRs about five minutes before we started play.

So our rules interpretations were certainly creative at some points, unorthodox at others, and out and out wrong at least once.

Of course, that didn't stop us from having a whole lot of fun.


PB1 Ham and Bloody Jam

This is a scenario that appeals to me for a number of reasons. Probably better than any other scenario I've played, it takes a very specific, memorable, and important action and commits it to cardboard form. It requires audacity on the part of the attacker and careful planning by the defense. Sure there's a few rules to learn, but that's never stopped me before....

The German defense was weighted to the East side of the Canal. Wire blocked the approach from North of the Road. Trenches were set up just to the South. Cafe Gondree and Cafe Picot were both garrisoned, as were Z20, the Pillbox, and the Trenches.

As British, there are two elements to the plan of attack: Who goes in which glider, and where the Intended Landing Hexes are going to go. I opted for a fairly balanced loading, and turned the audacity up to the max by aiming the gliders for the road just East of the bridge (Y21, Y22, Y23. We'd both missed the SSR that adds +1 to Landing DRs. Given the same setup and knowledge of that SSR, I'd probably call it W21, W22, and either X23 or Y22, trenches and their possible garrisons be damned).

This is where a second misunderstanding came into play. We hadn't understood correctly what happens to the occupants of a damaged glider, and assumed that it was much more lethal that it actually is. Consequentially, we played with a mulligan rule I'd heard about on the ASL Scenario Archive that essentially says that if the British don't get at least two gliders down intact, start over. In retrospect, this probably isn't necessary, and it allows the British player to be far more aggressive with the glider landings than otherwise sensible.

Even with the mulligan, one glider came down hard, with one squad reduced and a leader broken.

The survivors abandoned their gliders and set to work clearing the defenses. A series of sharp fights broke out, decided by point blank range gunfire and hand grenades over the course of the first APh and CCPh. By the end of British Turn 1, the first of the sappers had made it to the bridge.

By the end of Turn 2, the East bank of the canal was completely in British hands, and sappers started their work cutting wires running to the demolition pans.

Turns 3 and 4 were marked by repeated attempts by the British to force their way across the bridge against heavy fire from Cafe Gondree and Cafe Picot. Ultimately these attempts proved successful, though only because the cover of darkness prevented what would have doubtless been a costly route back to the East bank of the canal. At the end of Turn 4, Cafe Picot fell to the British, who then turned their attention South towards Cafe Gondree. The sappers continued their work throughout, the attempts to cross the bridge drawing fire that might otherwise have been directed their way.

The Cafe Gondree strong point (now a 2-3-6 and and LMG) couldn't hold out long against the combined attention of nearly a company of British airborne. They broke under fire, becoming disrupted in the process. At this point, it was pretty much game over. The British were guaranteed to take Cafe Gondree at the end of the turn. All that was left to do was to see if the sappers had completed their work.

The roll was a 3 and the sappers announced, after 4 turns of hard work under fire, that the demolition pans were empty.

Is it dicey? Yes. The glider landings and the need to clear the bridge see to that.

Is it a good way to learn night and glider rules? Yes.

Does it capture the drama of the first minutes of D-Day? Yes.

Is it fun? Absolutely.

Would I play it again? In a heartbeat.


PB3 Piecemeal

The scene shifted now to Benouville, in the early morning hours. On the one hand, we weren't under night rules any more. On the other, a +1 LV hindrance was in effect for the duration.

The Germans (this time elements of Panzer Division 21) were counterattacking through Benouville towards the bridge. The men of the 6th Airborne needed to hold them off. The Germans have two paths to victory-- either by exiting via the North edge between T10 and T18, or by scoring at least 10 CVP.

Despite the very tight record (now 42-40 pro British), I think the defense has a hard task. There just isn't much cover in the back field, route paths aren't quite what I'd like them to be, and the Germans have just enough men to keep the pressure on everywhere all at once. To top it off, the LV hindrance gives the Germans some movement options they otherwise wouldn't have.

Not wanting to be immediately overwhelmed, I set up roughly along hexrow J and K, with a reserve in building N11. Thinking about it now, this may have been a bit too far back-- an outpost or two in hexrow I could have done some pretty nasty damage to German troops as they attempted to cross Rue du Grand Clos.

The German attack came in two phases. The first, from roughly Turns 1-4, was defined by an attempt to grind through the village itself to win by CVP. The fighting in Benouville was not so much house to house (after all, the visibility wasn't all that great out of doors) as room to room.

Two massive melees developed, in K10 and K12. The K10 melee lasted almost three full turns as a squad and a half worth of airborne desperately fought against the better part of a platoon of Panzergrenadiers. They died fighting, but took more than their number with them, whittling the Germans down by a half squad or two as each turn passed.

By the beginning of Turn 5, the British defense had been subtly shifted Eastward. This is when phase two kicked in, and the Germans switched to an end run down Avenue de Caen. Two FlaK LKWs were able to exit almost unopposed, and infantry made it as far as R10 before the British were able to pull back far enough to put fire on the road.

It turned out to not be enough. Despite a few breaks and one Pin, the British just weren't able to throw enough firepower at the German exit corridor. A squad and a half were able to exit through a hail of residual firepower, and an 8-0 leader was able to make it right to the board edge, to exit in the APh.

This is one that I'm glad I played, but I won't be in a hurry to play again. If it hadn't been a Pegasus Bridge scenario, I probably wouldn't have given it a second glance.

One possibility that I only belatedly considered is that the classic defense for Gavin Take might also be applicable here. A couple of squads entrenched in T11 and T12 would suddenly make the exit condition look very unappealing.


Thank Yous!

Thanks to @Matt Boehland for two crazy, exhausting, and ultimately fantastic games.
Thanks also to @jrv -- without "Bring On The Night," this never would have been possible.
 
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Today was one of the bettter days of ASL - managed to play three scenarios

First off was DTF1 Keren Masala against Mikko Lukkari. This scenario uses the two Forgotten War hill boards 81 & 83 to depict a night/morning battle between Italians and Indians in Eritrea. No starshells are in use for the Night turns so this action is definitively out of the ordinary. I managed to slip four squads and two leaders cloaked past the Italian lines on the Indian right flank and this helped me grab the three hex victory are in the back just before Italian reinforcements joined the battle. In the end this helped me win and this hill tied up most of the reinforcements, I was able to keep all three of the hexes and gained enough for a comfortable win. Lack of starshells and No Movement combined makes the Italian setup a challenge and Mikko set up too far forward and did not manage to close all the gaps.

As Mikko still had some time we played a quick one BFP117 Silent Bayonets. This Poland in Flames Pole vs. Slovak offering has both sides setting up right on top of each other.Pole needs to clear village before Slovakian reinforcements join in. In our game I as the Pole made good initial success but I lost a leader and couple of squads in the process. I cleared away the initial Slovak force form all but one building where a HtH melee lasted for 2,5 turns until the end of the game. I was almost able to pull it off but the early losses and never ending melee int he back of the village meant that I did not have enough bodies to spread out to prevent Mikko occupying sufficient building hexes for a win on the last player turn..

Last was AP057 Kleckerweise against Rami Saarinen, we had started the scenario on on VASL couple of days ago and now we Finished it in a two hour session. The game ended on Turn 5 as Rami did not take the hill hex needed prevent the German sudden death victory. Basically Rami divided his troops wrong between Board 1a and Board 10 attack and did not push an aggressive enough attack against the German starting force and I was able to use the German turn 3 reinforcements to block the hill. This scenario has a steep learning curve to it and we agreed on a rematch in the near future as I think it is a quite interesting and different situation.
 
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Houlie

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Played WO30 As Luck Would Have It at our Twin Cities ASL day with Mark Harms. A 5.5 turn D-Day tourney scenario on board 11a where the Germans need to grab buildings to gain VP -- and need >=8 VP to win. The 6th Airborne Brits (8 x 648s + 57L) need to avoid losing those VC VP buildings AND not allow German non-crew personnel to exit thereby giving them EVP. Throw in a little bocage love and you have a Normandy smackdown.

The Germans were able to shimmy up to the village with just a few losses due to some hot shooting by the Brits. The Germans were careful to split up the four tanks as each one lost meant the VP requirement increased by one. Slow but steady progress, however, the Germans contniued to suffer under good British shooting. By this time, turn 4, the Huns had 8 VP -- two stone (3VP each) and two wooden (1VP each). The German now needed 9 VP as it lost the PzIV to the 57L, but I knew where it was and could stay out of harms way. Unfortunately, the Brits despite their good IFT dice, seemingly could NOT pass an MC breaking 2 key 648s, meaning it was very likely one would be NQed. One CC was in full swing, but the overall situation looked very uphill as it was quite likely the Germans would have 10 VP in their next player turn. and the two mobile AFV could keep units under DM (the other tank was earlier immob on ESB). At this point the Brits called for a withdrawal.

A nifty scenario fitting for D-Day a D+2 Saturday. The Brits set up equal-weight left and right half of the board. In retrospect, there needed to be more forces in the village. While it is possible the Germans go for a (German) right flank push to exit some non-crew personnel, that is a risky proposition. If it fails in any way, there is not enough FP to dislodge those tough paratroopers in the village. Even if you use the tanks to ferry riders to the board edge, it would be a risky all-or-nothing gamble, in our opinion.

A great way to spend a hot upper-80'sF Minnesota day where the heat was on about two weeks ago. Thanks to Mark for another great game. Always a tough competitor and a pleasure to play. A fun, challenging scenario. Currently 13-11 for the Germans on ROAR.
 
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Jacometti

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Played WO30 As Luck Would Have It at our Twin Cities ASL day with Mark Harms. A 5.5 turn D-Day tourney scenario on board 11a where the Germans need to grab buildings to gain VP -- and need >=8 VP to win. The 6th Airborne Brits (8 x 648s + 57L) need to avoid losing those VC VP buildings AND not allow German non-crew personnel to exit thereby giving them EVP. Throw in a little bocage love and you have a Normandy smackdown.

The Germans were able to shimmy up to the village with just a few losses due to some hot shooting by the Brits. The Germans were careful to split up the four tanks as each one lost meant the VP requirement increased by one. Slow but steady progress, however, the Germans contniued to suffer under good British shooting. By this time, turn 4, the Huns had 8 VP -- two stone (3VP each) and two wooden (1VP each). The German now needed 9 VP as it lost the PzIV to the 57L, but I knew where it was and could stay out of harms way. Unfortunately, the Brits despite their good IFT dice, seemingly could NOT pass an MC breaking 2 key 648s, meaning it was very likely one would be NQed. One CC was in full swing, but the overall situation looked very uphill as it was quite likely the Germans would have 10 VP in their next player turn. and the two mobile AFV could keep units under DM (the other tanks was earlier immob on ESB). At this point the Brits called for a withdrawal.

A nifty scenario fitting for D-Day a D+2 Saturday. The Brits set up equal-weight left and right half of the board. In retrospect, there needed to be more forces in the village. While it is possible the Germans go for a (German) right flank push to exit some non-crew personnel, that is a risky proposition. If it fails in any way, there is not enough FP to dislodge those tough paratroopers in the village. Even is you use the tanks to ferry riders to the board edge, it is a risky low-odds proposition, in our opinion.

A great way to spend a hot upper-80'sF Minnesota day where the heat was on about two weeks ago. Thanks to Mark for another great game. Always a tough competitor and a pleasure to play. A fun, challenging scenario. Currently 13-11 for the Germans on ROAR.
I played on 6 June (yes, on the day!) with Mark C. here in Halifax. I set up the British quite heavily in the village and he attacked with everything on the far side going only for the exit. I could not do anything to stop him, really. Lateral repositioning between the village force and the "side exit" area is so difficult for the Brits, because there is no cover except some grain. German MMGs and AFV can easily cut this off.

For me, a very difficult setup for the British and not a great scenario to play if the German goes for the exit. Oh, of course my AT gun malfunctioned on its first shot, as per the historical description. However it would not have made any difference if it didn't, it might have just bagged on AFV that was later killed by my infantry anyway.

Highlight: I created a Hero who SINGLE-HANDEDLY destroyed two German AFV. Well, sort of AFV. Open-topped, stunned and MG-less junk, really. But he did it!
 

Toby Pilling

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I played on 6 June (yes, on the day!) with Mark C. here in Halifax. I set up the British quite heavily in the village and he attacked with everything on the far side going only for the exit. I could not do anything to stop him, really. Lateral repositioning between the village force and the "side exit" area is so difficult for the Brits, because there is no cover except some grain. German MMGs and AFV can easily cut this off.

For me, a very difficult setup for the British and not a great scenario to play if the German goes for the exit. Oh, of course my AT gun malfunctioned on its first shot, as per the historical description. However it would not have made any difference if it didn't, it might have just bagged on AFV that was later killed by my infantry anyway.

Highlight: I created a Hero who SINGLE-HANDEDLY destroyed two German AFV. Well, sort of AFV. Open-topped, stunned and MG-less junk, really. But he did it!
I'm playing this at the moment, also to commemorate D-day, and am finding it a very 'rock, paper, scissors' scenario, in that the Brits have to sort of guess which attack the Germans will make (buildings or right flank). If they get it right, they can make a game of it. If not...
 

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For this weekend's Twin Cities ASL match, @Big Noodle and I got to play ASL 101 Throwing Down the Gauntlet. The intended theme for the day was OVERLORD, but it ended up being much more specific than that-- both games ended up focusing on the 6th Airborne. (See @Houlie's post for how the other one went.)

I commanded the Canadians of the 1st Parachute Battalion, @Big Noodle commanded the Germans of the 711th Bodenstandige Division.


Setup and Initial Thoughts
The goal of the attack is to capture buildings and a pillbox located roughly in the center of the board, as well as to score CVP. There's a lot of ground to cover, but at night that's not too much of an issue. Staying near the roads will prevent straying, but limits how close I can get before running into an outpost.

It will probably be necessary to capture prisoners in order to score CVP. This is an especially attractive option since the Canadians are holy terrors in CC and the +1 DRM for taking prisoners becomes -1 when making the attempt against conscripts.

The Canadians can choose to enter from any of the North, South, or West edges. I chose to enter from the South as it provides roads for the inital approach and cover closer to the village.


The Fighting
I chose to stack heavily on the advance. Only three of my cloaking counters represented anything other than paranoia induced by bad rumors and the sound of aircraft engines. However, each of those counters contained an entire platoon. The idea was that if I did end up straying, at least I'd have a viable fighting force wherever I ended up.

As it so happened, straying wasn't much of an issue, and my forces advanced North up the roads without incident.

Fortune quickly began to turn against the Canadians in other regards. NVR change rolls in the first couple of turns soon resulted in an NVR of 5-- NOT something that I either expected or desired, as I was hoping to rely on a stealthy approach.

Matters went from bad to worse. The Germans had an outpost between the southern wheat field and the road, and I was determined to neutralize it. I detailed a squad and the 9-2 leader to do the job, figuring to approach concealed and take it out in Close Combat. Stealthy, Leadership, Concealed-- a total of a -5 ambush DRM. Piece of cake, right?

Wrong. The place was covered in wire, which I only learned about when my units tripped into it. Then there was no ambush. Then I failed to kill the defenders (I'd been hoping for a 3-2 attack with a -3 DRM, what I got was 3-2 -1). And then those same defenders roll a '3' on their CC roll. There went my best leader.

The situation could be better, but there was still time to recover. By this point, my troops were spread out roughly in a line between the southern edge of the wheat field and the pond. The majority were creeping up the Eastern side of the board, beginning to hook in towards the center. There was still plenty of time to make things work.

A few matters started to go my way. The PaK 40 revealed itself, positioned near the northern end of the wheat field. I was able to grab a couple of victory buildings East of the roads, and my forces were in position to push into the village from the South and East.


Throwing Down the Gauntlet in the Towel
Naturally, this is when my attack completely disintegrated. I lost a second leader (the 8-1, of course) from point blank range 75mm fire in an attempt to flank the PaK 40. At about the same time all attempts to cross the road from the East were utterly repulsed. With only one leader left to rally all of the broken units and nowhere near the the amount of time that would be necessary to do so, I called off the attack.


Conclusions
This was a somewhat frustrating game, because I didn't feel I learned much from it. Getting more comfortable with the night rules was a good thing, but when basically every critical roll went very badly against me, it was rather difficult to evaluate what I was doing right or wrong.

That being said, I would still recommend this scenario to anyone wanting to learn or get better with the basics of the night rules.


Thank Yous!
Thanks to @Big Noodle for being a wonderful, fun, and gracious opponent. Also for not immediately balking when I handed him two beach landings and a night scenario to choose from.

Thanks to the folks of TCASL-- always great to see you all and play some ASL!
 
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fenyan

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G6/190 Rocket’s Red Glare

I have never played this scenario before but have heard many recommend it. The American paratroops must achieve building control in one of two wooden buildings at any point in the game: Board 3, "the Gavin Take" map, O10 at the bottom of a center village surrounded by a road or Q7, a building at the opposite edge of the map. Defending are several SS 6-5-8s.

The paratroops advanced from the I1 Woods-Building as well as the starting clump of buildings west of it. The M36 tank destroyer moved up on the hill to bombard the O10 village below.

The Flakpanzer was lost early to the M36; the StuG stayed out of sight. When the M36 attempted to circle around to a hull-down position to the StuG’s rear, a squad at two-hex range got both panzerfausts and hit it in the turret on the second attempt.

On the last turn, O10 had a 9-2, wounded hero, and fanatic 2-2-8 in CC with a 9-1 and 3-3-7. Germans won the ambush but rolls were no effect for both sides. Q7 had a 3-3-8 against a 3-3-7. The Americans got the ambush but both rolls were also no effect.

Bottom of the 6th, German turn but all of their units are locked in melee. No Defensive Fire into the objective hexes and we redid the melees. O10, both sides rolled low and eliminated each other. Germans maintain control. Q7, the Germans eliminate the American half-squad while it rolled a “7” to no effect. We had a great game, a very fun scenario.
 

Cult.44

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I played on 6 June (yes, on the day!) with Mark C. here in Halifax. I set up the British quite heavily in the village and he attacked with everything on the far side going only for the exit. I could not do anything to stop him, really. Lateral repositioning between the village force and the "side exit" area is so difficult for the Brits, because there is no cover except some grain. German MMGs and AFV can easily cut this off.

For me, a very difficult setup for the British and not a great scenario to play if the German goes for the exit. Oh, of course my AT gun malfunctioned on its first shot, as per the historical description. However it would not have made any difference if it didn't, it might have just bagged on AFV that was later killed by my infantry anyway.

Highlight: I created a Hero who SINGLE-HANDEDLY destroyed two German AFV. Well, sort of AFV. Open-topped, stunned and MG-less junk, really. But he did it!
That's what I worried about when I set up, a heavy attack on the British left with just a holding force approaching the village. Even set up the way I was, with the AT gun on the left and my 9-2 leader, I wasn't sure I could stop it if the Germans came that way. As it was Craig sniffed it out and attacked the village with everything. I was able to get my 9-2 and a couple of squads back to the village and make it fight for awhile but it felt uphill all the way. Nevertheless I enjoyed the scenario and Craig's always a tough, fun opponent.
 

pensatl1962

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I played on 6 June (yes, on the day!) with Mark C. here in Halifax. I set up the British quite heavily in the village and he attacked with everything on the far side going only for the exit. I could not do anything to stop him, really. Lateral repositioning between the village force and the "side exit" area is so difficult for the Brits, because there is no cover except some grain. German MMGs and AFV can easily cut this off.

For me, a very difficult setup for the British and not a great scenario to play if the German goes for the exit. Oh, of course my AT gun malfunctioned on its first shot, as per the historical description. However it would not have made any difference if it didn't, it might have just bagged on AFV that was later killed by my infantry anyway.

Highlight: I created a Hero who SINGLE-HANDEDLY destroyed two German AFV. Well, sort of AFV. Open-topped, stunned and MG-less junk, really. But he did it!
I also played this scenario (WO30 As Luck Would Have It) last Saturday -- seemed to be the thing to do this D-Day anniversary weekend -- and it played out pretty much as described here. My opponent set up strong in the village; the AT gun, a leader, 6-4-8 and mortar were in the British back left to guard the board edge. I pushed strongly along the German right board edge with 6 squads, two leaders, the PzIV J and one of the 75mm assault guns. An interdiction stack with both MMGs and both LMGs covered the gap between the village and the grain field. The 105mm assault gun joined them but malf'd it's first shot, so it's turn 2 orders were to reverse and back off the board edge. He tried redeploying strongly to his left, but by German turn 3, my squads and leaders were positioned for an unscathed final rush to Q17 and off.
 

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WO30 As Luck Would Have It My opponent and I played this one today, and even before we started my opponent was saying it looks impossible for the Brits. My Brit set up was the same, strong in the village and AT assets in the back. Due to fire lane set ups with the German MMG's, there was no way I could stop his attack. By turn 3 it was over. I guess it is a dog which kind of amazes me since Ma Dush was such a good scenario. We might try Corps Values Saturday, but from what I have heard thus far it too is a four legged dog but I am a glutton for punishment, so we will see.

Scott

I also played this scenario (WO30 As Luck Would Have It) last Saturday -- seemed to be the thing to do this D-Day anniversary weekend -- and it played out pretty much as described here. My opponent set up strong in the village; the AT gun, a leader, 6-4-8 and mortar were in the British back left to guard the board edge. I pushed strongly along the German right board edge with 6 squads, two leaders, the PzIV J and one of the 75mm assault guns. An interdiction stack with both MMGs and both LMGs covered the gap between the village and the grain field. The 105mm assault gun joined them but malf'd it's first shot, so it's turn 2 orders were to reverse and back off the board edge. He tried redeploying strongly to his left, but by German turn 3, my squads and leaders were positioned for an unscathed final rush to Q17 and off.
 

Philippe D.

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I played HF4 Liehr Launches First over a few VASL sessions. I got the attacking Germans, and I know how hard it can be to attack Americans in good defensive terrain, so my initial plan was to get some forces on the sides to cut on skulking and maybe prevent some routing (the main attack thrust is along a street bordered by stone buildings, with some rubble thrown in).

I tried to send a PzIV on the north side, and unfortunately, picked the wrong place when I stopped it right next to a HIP M10 GMC: dead PzIV. To make matters worse, the infantry I had sent this way also took some hits, and I lost a lot of bodies in the first two turns. Fortunately, the M10, and the M18 that came to support the area, got hit by Panzerfaust and ended up as burning wrecks.

In the main street, my attack also bogged down. Fear of the remaining HIP M10 made me extra cautious, and I didn't try the same enveloping move on the southern flank. I made the mistake of sending the remaining PzIV along the street to make routing along the street more difficult for the Germans, but it died to a well-placed Bazooka round. I managed to rally all my broken infantry for the final push, but it was too late, and I had inflicted way too few losses on the defenders; we called it at the beginning of the last German turn, when it was clear that I could take two buildings, but not much more.

Overall, I lost to a combination of bad choices and some bad rolls. Still, the scenario was pretty enjoyable (as have been all the Hatten scenarios I have played so far - this HASL is really a success).
 
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