October 25

Jazz

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Joined
Feb 3, 2003
Messages
10,931
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1,345
Location
The Empty Quarter
Country
llLithuania
1415

"This day is called the feast of Crispian:
He that outlives this day, and comes safe home,
Will stand a tip-toe when the day is named,
And rouse him at the name of Crispian.
He that shall live this day, and see old age,
Will yearly on the vigil feast his neighbours,
And say 'To-morrow is Saint Crispian.'
Then will he strip his sleeve and show his scars,
And say 'These wounds I had on Crispin's day.'
Old men forget: yet all shall be forgot,
But he'll remember with advantages
What feats he did that day: then shall our names,
Familiar in his mouth as household words
Harry the king, Bedford and Exeter,
Warwick and Talbot, Salisbury and Gloucester,
Be in their flowing cups freshly remember'd.
This story shall the good man teach his son;
And Crispin Crispian shall ne'er go by,
From this day to the ending of the world,
But we in it shall be remember'd;
We few, we happy few, we band of brothers;
For he to-day that sheds his blood with me
Shall be my brother; be he ne'er so vile,
This day shall gentle his condition:
And gentlemen in England now a-bed
Shall think themselves accursed they were not here,
And hold their manhoods cheap whiles any speaks
That fought with us upon Saint Crispin's day"

1854

Half a league, half a league,Half a league onward,
All in the valley of Death
Rode the six hundred.
"Forward the Light Brigade!Charge for the guns!" he said.
Into the valley of Death
Rode the six hundred.
Forward, the Light Brigade!"
Was there a man dismay'd?
Not tho' the soldier knew
Some one had blunder'd.
Their's not to make reply,
Their's not to reason why,
Their's but to do and die.
Into the valley of Death
Rode the six hundred.
Cannon to right of them,
Cannon to left of them,
Cannon in front of them
Volley'd and thunder'd;
Storm'd at with shot and shell,
Boldly they rode and well,
Into the jaws of Death,
Into the mouth of hell
Rode the six hundred.
Flash'd all their sabres bare,
Flash'd as they turn'd in air
Sabring the gunners there,
Charging an army, while
All the world wonder'd.
Plunged in the battery-smoke
Right thro' the line they broke;
Cossack and Russian
Reel'd from the sabre-stroke
Shatter'd and sunder'd.
Then they rode back, but not,
Not the six hundred.
Cannon to right of them,
Cannon to left of them,
Cannon behind them
Volley'd and thunder'd;
Storm'd at with shot and shell,
While horse and hero fell,
They that had fought so well
Came thro' the jaws of Death,
Back from the mouth of Hell,
All that was left of them,
Left of six hundred.
When can their glory fade?
O the wild charge they made!
All the world wonder'd.
Honor the charge they made!
Honor the Light Brigade,
Noble six hundred!

1944

Ernest Edwin Evans

"For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above
and beyond the call of duty as commanding officer of the U.S.S. Johnston
in action against major units of the enemy Japanese fleet during the
Battle off Samar on 25 October 1944. The first to lay a smokescreen and
to open fire as an enemy task force, vastly superior in number,
firepower and armor, rapidly approached. Comdr. Evans gallantly diverted
the powerful blasts of hostile guns from the lightly armed and armored
carriers under his protection, launching the first torpedo attack when
the Johnston came under straddling Japanese shellfire. Undaunted by
damage sustained under the terrific volume of fire, he unhesitatingly
joined others of his group to provide fire support during subsequent
torpedo attacks against the Japanese and, outshooting and outmaneuvering
the enemy as he consistently interposed his vessel between the hostile
fleet units and our carriers despite the crippling loss of engine power
and communications with steering aft, shifted command to the fantail,
shouted steering orders through an open hatch to men turning the rudder
by hand and battled furiously until the Johnston, burning and shuddering
from a mortal blow, lay dead in the water after 3 hours of fierce
combat. Seriously wounded early in the engagement, Comdr. Evans, by his
indomitable courage and brilliant professional skill, aided materially
in turning back the enemy during a critical phase of the action. His
valiant fighting spirit throughout this historic battle will venture as
an inspiration to all who served with him."

You surely already know all the references: "Henry V", William
Shakespeare; "The Charge of the Light Brigade", Alfred Lord Tennyson;
and the CMOH citation for Commander Evans.

Thanks to Peter Simer for reminding me.....
 

Actionjick

Elder Member
Joined
Apr 23, 2020
Messages
2,310
Reaction score
1,443
Country
llUnited States
1415

"This day is called the feast of Crispian:
He that outlives this day, and comes safe home,
Will stand a tip-toe when the day is named,
And rouse him at the name of Crispian.
He that shall live this day, and see old age,
Will yearly on the vigil feast his neighbours,
And say 'To-morrow is Saint Crispian.'
Then will he strip his sleeve and show his scars,
And say 'These wounds I had on Crispin's day.'
Old men forget: yet all shall be forgot,
But he'll remember with advantages
What feats he did that day: then shall our names,
Familiar in his mouth as household words
Harry the king, Bedford and Exeter,
Warwick and Talbot, Salisbury and Gloucester,
Be in their flowing cups freshly remember'd.
This story shall the good man teach his son;
And Crispin Crispian shall ne'er go by,
From this day to the ending of the world,
But we in it shall be remember'd;
We few, we happy few, we band of brothers;
For he to-day that sheds his blood with me
Shall be my brother; be he ne'er so vile,
This day shall gentle his condition:
And gentlemen in England now a-bed
Shall think themselves accursed they were not here,
And hold their manhoods cheap whiles any speaks
That fought with us upon Saint Crispin's day"

1854

Half a league, half a league,Half a league onward,
All in the valley of Death
Rode the six hundred.
"Forward the Light Brigade!Charge for the guns!" he said.
Into the valley of Death
Rode the six hundred.
Forward, the Light Brigade!"
Was there a man dismay'd?
Not tho' the soldier knew
Some one had blunder'd.
Their's not to make reply,
Their's not to reason why,
Their's but to do and die.
Into the valley of Death
Rode the six hundred.
Cannon to right of them,
Cannon to left of them,
Cannon in front of them
Volley'd and thunder'd;
Storm'd at with shot and shell,
Boldly they rode and well,
Into the jaws of Death,
Into the mouth of hell
Rode the six hundred.
Flash'd all their sabres bare,
Flash'd as they turn'd in air
Sabring the gunners there,
Charging an army, while
All the world wonder'd.
Plunged in the battery-smoke
Right thro' the line they broke;
Cossack and Russian
Reel'd from the sabre-stroke
Shatter'd and sunder'd.
Then they rode back, but not,
Not the six hundred.
Cannon to right of them,
Cannon to left of them,
Cannon behind them
Volley'd and thunder'd;
Storm'd at with shot and shell,
While horse and hero fell,
They that had fought so well
Came thro' the jaws of Death,
Back from the mouth of Hell,
All that was left of them,
Left of six hundred.
When can their glory fade?
O the wild charge they made!
All the world wonder'd.
Honor the charge they made!
Honor the Light Brigade,
Noble six hundred!

1944

Ernest Edwin Evans

"For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above
and beyond the call of duty as commanding officer of the U.S.S. Johnston
in action against major units of the enemy Japanese fleet during the
Battle off Samar on 25 October 1944. The first to lay a smokescreen and
to open fire as an enemy task force, vastly superior in number,
firepower and armor, rapidly approached. Comdr. Evans gallantly diverted
the powerful blasts of hostile guns from the lightly armed and armored
carriers under his protection, launching the first torpedo attack when
the Johnston came under straddling Japanese shellfire. Undaunted by
damage sustained under the terrific volume of fire, he unhesitatingly
joined others of his group to provide fire support during subsequent
torpedo attacks against the Japanese and, outshooting and outmaneuvering
the enemy as he consistently interposed his vessel between the hostile
fleet units and our carriers despite the crippling loss of engine power
and communications with steering aft, shifted command to the fantail,
shouted steering orders through an open hatch to men turning the rudder
by hand and battled furiously until the Johnston, burning and shuddering
from a mortal blow, lay dead in the water after 3 hours of fierce
combat. Seriously wounded early in the engagement, Comdr. Evans, by his
indomitable courage and brilliant professional skill, aided materially
in turning back the enemy during a critical phase of the action. His
valiant fighting spirit throughout this historic battle will venture as
an inspiration to all who served with him."

You surely already know all the references: "Henry V", William
Shakespeare; "The Charge of the Light Brigade", Alfred Lord Tennyson;
and the CMOH citation for Commander Evans.

Thanks to Peter Simer for reminding me.....
The Ballad of Rodger Young, Starship Troopers where I heard of him.

Last Stand of the Tin Can Sailors for more about Cmdr. Evans

Thanks for the thread.
 
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