Mortars.....the most interesting/unigue weapon in ASL?

serpico

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The infantry are in a straight row across the screen, from the right (about 1/3rd down)to approximately the center.....they must be waiting to attack...

Looks more like a training exercise anyway.

I thought smoke rounds were limited ammo?

Didn't aircraft drop white phosphorous rounds? I know not conventional smoke.....:OHNO:
 

DerBlitzer

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No the aircraft didn't drop the smoke. I know of no smoke ordnance from aircraft and that is a fighter anyways.
I'm reading a number of books about the Soviet drive to Berlin, and Koniev, according to one account, did use aircraft to blanket a section of the Oder with smoke before he sent troops across it.
 

Eagle4ty

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If you ever want to know the true value of LT MTRS, play RB with the wealth of LT MTRS (and the occasional 81/82mm ones) on roof-tops that you'll normally find. Now THAT really limits your movement! Darn pesky!:(
 

Brian W

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I'm reading a number of books about the Soviet drive to Berlin, and Koniev, according to one account, did use aircraft to blanket a section of the Oder with smoke before he sent troops across it.
The Soviets were quite obsessed about using SMOKE; ASL doesn't portray that obsession very well.
 

countermanCX

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Sign me up for ASL mtr-luv, s'long's i get to use the IIFT w/ my Italian 45*!

Seriously, tho' LtMtrs might not have much FP, they're great for delivering additional harassment to enemy movement - & i really enjoy the RB 'rooftop war'.

For add'l info, try E. Sledge, "With the Old Breed". He was a USMC 60mm mtrman, and while his narrative doesn't describe HE vs. Smoke ammo loads, he never mentions running out of ammo, even during the 'orrid supply difficulties of Okinawa during the 'mud month'.

But he does mention that setting up his mtr involved placing 'range stakes' (to mark desired azimuth & estimated range for specific defensive fires?) which leads me to think that an 'emplaced' LtMtr (one that hasn't moved since scenario start) would be more effective (in the TH# sense) than one that had moved during play.
 

serpico

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Sign me up for ASL mtr-luv, s'long's i get to use the IIFT w/ my Italian 45*!

Seriously, tho' LtMtrs might not have much FP, they're great for delivering additional harassment to enemy movement - & i really enjoy the RB 'rooftop war'.

For add'l info, try E. Sledge, "With the Old Breed". He was a USMC 60mm mtrman, and while his narrative doesn't describe HE vs. Smoke ammo loads, he never mentions running out of ammo, even during the 'orrid supply difficulties of Okinawa during the 'mud month'.

But he does mention that setting up his mtr involved placing 'range stakes' (to mark desired azimuth & estimated range for specific defensive fires?) which leads me to think that an 'emplaced' LtMtr (one that hasn't moved since scenario start) would be more effective (in the TH# sense) than one that had moved during play.
Hi Counterman,

Why would it be more effective? In the ASL sense that is.......:smoke:
 

Jazz

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But he does mention that setting up his mtr involved placing 'range stakes' (to mark desired azimuth & estimated range for specific defensive fires?) which leads me to think that an 'emplaced' LtMtr (one that hasn't moved since scenario start) would be more effective (in the TH# sense) than one that had moved during play.
You mean kinda like boresighting?
 

RobZagnut

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I love every single aspect of Mortars in ASL. I wouldn't change a thing. They feel right in every way. Mortars are one of the many bright spots in ASL that keep you coming back for more.
 

2 Bit Bill

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I love every single aspect of Mortars in ASL. I wouldn't change a thing. They feel right in every way. Mortars are one of the many bright spots in ASL that keep you coming back for more.
Possibly the addition of auto airbursts due to the development of the proximety fuse. It would be nationality and time specfic.
 

Eagle4ty

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Possibly the addition of auto airbursts due to the development of the proximety fuse. It would be nationality and time specfic.
Always thought that should be used with some type of USAGE/DEPLETION # (probablly pretty low). Of course it exists in one of my infamous "house rules" for scenarios around NOV 44 and after, especially in the N ETO.

Haven't really found the historical precedence for mortar usage, but the US Army historical series about the Bulge and the Rhine River operations are repleat with mentions of usage of VT (Variable Timed) fused shells by artillery.
An "All Black" (read that in todays parlance: Afro-American) artillery unit helping defend Bastonge almost destroyed and entire VG Div Rgt assault with some very accurate and timely TOT (Time on Target) of VT.
 

Blackcloud6

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But he does mention that setting up his mtr involved placing 'range stakes' (to mark desired azimuth & estimated range for specific defensive fires?) which leads me to think that an 'emplaced' LtMtr (one that hasn't moved since scenario start) would be more effective (in the TH# sense) than one that had moved during play.
Actually they are called "aiming stakes" and they are used for indirect fire. (Direct fire mortar shots are done through the site on the gun, it's called "direct lay'). each gun in the section has a pair of aiming stakes laid out (one near and one far) on an azimuth form the gun. This is done after each gun is laid in by the chief of the section through the aiming circle (sort of a surveyor's site). This process mathematically lays in the guns all lined up ogether. When the fire mission comes from the FDC, each gunner puts the azimuth on the sight and hen lines up the aiming stakes with the reticle in the site. Then when the rounds are fired from each gun they all go to the same place and at the same distance apart as each gun (called a "normal sheaf"). It is pretty cool how it all works.

Now, a single gun that has been in position for awhile may have stakes or azimuth marks set out so a crew can quickly fire on pre-registered targets.

(disclaimer: it has been 20+ years since I was a mortar PL so I may have left out a detail or two. I have fired 107mm, 81mm and 60mm mortars and was a PL for a 81mm platoon)
 

Michael Dorosh

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Actually they are called "aiming stakes" and they are used for indirect fire. (Direct fire mortar shots are done through the site on the gun, it's called "direct lay'). each gun in the section has a pair of aiming stakes laid out (one near and one far) on an azimuth form the gun. This is done after each gun is laid in by the chief of the section through the aiming circle (sort of a surveyor's site). This process mathematically lays in the guns all lined up ogether. When the fire mission comes from the FDC, each gunner puts the azimuth on the sight and hen lines up the aiming stakes with the reticle in the site. Then when the rounds are fired from each gun they all go to the same place and at the same distance apart as each gun (called a "normal sheaf"). It is pretty cool how it all works.

Now, a single gun that has been in position for awhile may have stakes or azimuth marks set out so a crew can quickly fire on pre-registered targets.

(disclaimer: it has been 20+ years since I was a mortar PL so I may have left out a detail or two. I have fired 107mm, 81mm and 60mm mortars and was a PL for a 81mm platoon)
You can use "ranging" stakes for direct fire also, so the term itself is not necessarily in error (excellent post, by the way).

We had a regular force Warrant Officer for RSS (Regular Support Staff) in our reserve unit. Legend had it that he had ranging stakes set up in his neighbourhood as well as a range card set up on the balcony of his apartment. (He obviously had no mortar, but did have a goodly selection of firearms). He also had, again, according to legend, fighting knives stuck in the wall/bookshelves at 3 or 4 feet intervals so that in the event that something went down, he'd never be more than arm's length from a weapon.

He used to blink a lot.

Did I mention that the Canadian Army mess tins were made out of aluminum?
 
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