German squad, section or team names for WW2

von Marwitz

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My dad saw some of those Diesels at Goose Bay, Labrador when working seismic there in the 1970s. He took photos of the signs on base that read LUFTWAFFE but back then neither of us had a clue how to pronounce it. At one time, GATES (German Army Training Establishment Shilo) had more tanks in Manitoba than the Canadian Army had tanks in the world. I still remember the Legion Magazine doing an interview with their CO, an Oberstleutnant IIRC named Nik Frankenstein.
When I was a kid, I visited my aunt a couple of times during the holidays, who lived in a rural area of Germany.
Back then, NATO airforces were quite busy practicing low level flights. I seem to recall they weren't supposed to go lower than something like 500 ft., but for sure some did. Sometimes I could see the visors of the pilots and the decals on their helmets. Especially the "Phantoms" were freakishly loud. I also remember German "Tornados", "Alpha Jet" trainers, F-16s, A-10s, British "Harriers". Understandably, my aunt hated them for the noise, but I found them exciting and interesting.

von Marwitz
 

Michael Dorosh

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Infanterie Group = Rifle squad
For this, you need context. Group translates literally to Gruppe. A "Gruppe" is the equivalent of an (infantry) squad. The squadleader would be called the "Gruppenführer", literally group leader. You will hardly find a denomination smaller than the company (Kompanie) in official records. Smaller units such as the 'Zug' (Platoon), 'Gruppe' (Squad), or 'Trupp' (Halfsquad) are mentioned, this mostly serves the purpose to give an idea of the number of men involved.
Mostly in combination with a name, such as 'Gruppe Döring', what is meant would most likely be the short form of 'Kampfgruppe Döring'.
Gruppenführer was also a specific rank title in the Waffen-SS, equivalent to a Generalleutnant (Lieutenant-General) in the Army. Anecdotally, an SS general inspecting new troops in Normandy apparently asked a young SS man what his job in the battalion was. He proudly replied "Gruppenführer, Gruppenführer." (The SS abolished the use of the prefix "Herr" to keep in line with their National-Socialist ideals of a classless society.)
 

Actionjick

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The wife is watching Where Eagles Dare and the Germans had a helicopter, I suppose that was an actual Wunderwaffe. I remembered that Panzerblitz had a variant in The General called Chopperblitz.

Did anyone ever play that variant and when do you think we will see helicopters in ASL?? Are they in the Korean ASL variant?

I have a vague recollection that the U.S. used a few helicopters in the PTO but have no idea where I got that notion from.
 

Michael Dorosh

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The wife is watching Where Eagles Dare and the Germans had a helicopter, I suppose that was an actual Wunderwaffe. I remembered that Panzerblitz had a variant in The General called Chopperblitz.

Did anyone ever play that variant and when do you think we will see helicopters in ASL?? Are they in the Korean ASL variant?

I have a vague recollection that the U.S. used a few helicopters in the PTO but have no idea where I got that notion from.
No helicopters in Korea - they were used mainly, AIUI, for medical evacuation behind the lines.

Google finds me this:

 

M.Koch

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The wife is watching Where Eagles Dare and the Germans had a helicopter, I suppose that was an actual Wunderwaffe. I remembered that Panzerblitz had a variant in The General called Chopperblitz.

Did anyone ever play that variant and when do you think we will see helicopters in ASL?? Are they in the Korean ASL variant?

I have a vague recollection that the U.S. used a few helicopters in the PTO but have no idea where I got that notion from.
Clint... cool as f*ck....

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Michael Dorosh

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View attachment 15330

I don't think that one would wear a 'Pour le mérite" on the breast but rather on the collar like a "Ritterkreuz".

Besides that, the painting on the wall in the background is a forgery. ;)

von Marwitz
He's not, it is the Kriegverdienstkreuz 1. Klasse mit schwertern…..

The War Merit Cross came in multiple grades, like the Iron Cross, but was awarded for merit


Info on the system of awards here:

 

von Marwitz

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Germans of that era weren't allowed to be left handed though - dead giveaway for an Allied spy....
Probably, he would have been discovered instantly had he begun to talk as instructed:

HAHLT! VAR-ten zee ai-nen OW-gen-blik! (Halt! Warten Sie einen Augenblick!)

Quoted from the "Pocket Guide to Germany (1944)" issued to US soldiers.

von Marwitz
 
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M.Koch

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When I was a kid, I visited my aunt a couple of times during the holidays, who lived in a rural area of Germany.
Back then, NATO airforces were quite busy practicing low level flights. I seem to recall they weren't supposed to go lower than something like 500 ft., but for sure some did. Sometimes I could see the visors of the pilots and the decals on their helmets. Especially the "Phantoms" were freakishly loud. I also remember German "Tornados", "Alpha Jet" trainers, F-16s, A-10s, British "Harriers". Understandably, my aunt hated them for the noise, but I found them exciting and interesting.

von Marwitz
The sound of freedom ??
 
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