El Alamein

bendizoid

Official ***** Dickweed
Joined
Sep 11, 2006
Messages
3,552
Reaction score
1,532
Location
Viet Nam
Country
llUnited States
I think there are still millions of mines out there.
 

Michael Dorosh

der Spieß des Forums
Gold Supporting Member
Joined
Feb 6, 2004
Messages
15,573
Reaction score
2,483
Location
Calgary, AB
First name
Michael
Country
llCanada
I think there are still millions of mines out there.
I can still hear Laurence Olivier's voice in the World at War series: "They code-named it Operation LIGHTFOOT. Sick joke if ever there was one...."
 

Yuri0352

Elder Member
Joined
Nov 21, 2014
Messages
1,958
Reaction score
925
Location
25-30 Hexes
Country
llUnited States
I can still hear Laurence Olivier's voice in the World at War series: "They code-named it Operation LIGHTFOOT. Sick joke if ever there was one...."
My favorite episode of that entire series. The scene of the panzer crewmen frying eggs on the fender of their tank left quite an impression on me at the time.
 

The Purist

Elder Member
Joined
Aug 16, 2004
Messages
2,844
Reaction score
1,334
Location
In my castle by the sea, Trochu, AB
First name
Gerry
Country
llCanada
That was actually propaganda footage. They used a torch to heat the fender hot enough to fry an egg. It get's hot in the desert,.... but not that hot.

I have the DVD series and for its day it was a good doco but it is definitely showing its age after nearly 50 years.
 

Michael Dorosh

der Spieß des Forums
Gold Supporting Member
Joined
Feb 6, 2004
Messages
15,573
Reaction score
2,483
Location
Calgary, AB
First name
Michael
Country
llCanada
My favorite episode of that entire series. The scene of the panzer crewmen frying eggs on the fender of their tank left quite an impression on me at the time.
8th Army marching into Tripoli to the tune of "Leaving Port Askaig" gets me every time.....
 

Eagle4ty

Forum Guru
Joined
Nov 7, 2007
Messages
5,244
Reaction score
2,961
Location
Eau Claire, Wi
Country
llUnited States
I
That was actually propaganda footage. They used a torch to heat the fender hot enough to fry an egg. It get's hot in the desert,.... but not that hot.

I have the DVD series and for its day it was a good doco but it is definitely showing its age after nearly 50 years.
I can personally attest than one CAN fry an egg on an AFV in the desert, at least on an Bradley in the desert of western Iraq. Used to heat up our MRE's all the time as well by leaving them on the fender/hood(bonet) of the HUMMWV.
 

JRKrejsa

Elder Member
Joined
Sep 21, 2005
Messages
3,473
Reaction score
888
Location
USA
Country
llUnited States
That was actually propaganda footage. They used a torch to heat the fender hot enough to fry an egg. It get's hot in the desert,.... but not that hot.

I have the DVD series and for its day it was a good doco but it is definitely showing its age after nearly 50 years.
True, but still fun to watch.
From a”oldies viewpoint.” Not a “learn something “, perspective.
 

The Purist

Elder Member
Joined
Aug 16, 2004
Messages
2,844
Reaction score
1,334
Location
In my castle by the sea, Trochu, AB
First name
Gerry
Country
llCanada
I can personally attest than one CAN fry an egg on an AFV in the desert, at least on an Bradley in the desert of western Iraq. Used to heat up our MRE's all the time as well by leaving them on the fender/hood(bonet) of the HUMMWV.
;) :unsure:

We tried it on a bare metal plate out in the Arabian Desert outside Riyad (Saudi Arabia) in the summer of 2016. The temp was 53 deg C (127.4 deg F) . Unlike the coast (humid as hell), the interior plateau is about 2000' above sea level and very dry (stress "very"). While the egg white 'sort of' turned a bit white, we ended up with a runny mess. Not sure how Colonel Lawrence got his English breakfast in 1917. :LOL:

I believe it takes about 20 minutes to fry an egg at 130 deg F (54.4 deg C), which is quite a slow cook. Normally, one needs 158 deg F (70 deg C) for an egg to fry 'normally'. Perhaps the HMMWV's engine was giving you those extra degrees.
 
Last edited:

Old Noob

Senior Member
Joined
Jan 10, 2020
Messages
390
Reaction score
348
Country
llUnited States
I first watched "The World at War" (first American viewing) in 1972. Some 30+ years later obtained the set and occasionally still watch them {not much else
to do during COVID}. Granted a bit dated, but when you consider that the creators still had access to many of the mid-level people [who were still alive at
the time] it's a very good series. No alternate theories or conspiracies put forth, just the facts.
 

Michael Dorosh

der Spieß des Forums
Gold Supporting Member
Joined
Feb 6, 2004
Messages
15,573
Reaction score
2,483
Location
Calgary, AB
First name
Michael
Country
llCanada
That's true. I especially like the interviews with Brian Horrocks (XXX Corps commander) both for Market-Garden and the Rhineland battles.

Almost throw my remote through the TV whenever I see Mark Clark.
It's fun to see Ernst-Otto Remer too.
 
Top