Da Paul Challenge

witchbottles

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I'd think bounding first fire from that jalopy would be more than halved. :) imagine pedaling toward the enemy, steering with one hand and firing with the other :)


i wonder if that would stop the quadricycle from the recoil without a need of a stop MP:)

@footsteps - we need a counter for that MG armed quadricycle!!!!
 

Gordon

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I'd think bounding first fire from that jalopy would be more than halved. :) imagine pedaling toward the enemy, steering with one hand and firing with the other :)


i wonder if that would stop the quadricycle from the recoil without a need of a stop MP:)

@footsteps - we need a counter for that MG armed quadricycle!!!!
Spraying fire is mandatory.
 

Yuri0352

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View attachment 9831


how many DRM do you think this Gunshield would give?
The attire of this vehicle's operator and the fact that is not being ridden by a uniformed soldier could be an indication of both this contraption's design philosophy and the probability of it ever being adopted for service.
 

King Scott

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The attire of this vehicle's operator and the fact that is not being ridden by a uniformed soldier could be an indication of both this contraption's design philosophy and the probability of it ever being adopted for service.
The Gentlemens solution to labor unrest? they called it "The Strike Breaker." :p:rofl:

Semper Fi!
Scott
 

Justiciar

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Looks like it is amphibious too ;) ...note the paddle on the right side...
I wonder if that is not a raft bundled up at the front though...
 
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Justiciar

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As I recall Tamiya 1/35th scale...had this build option...in now of their later kits...maybe it was on an "85" even... almost Key Lime Pie color... :(

Also that is not discount....that is promotional freebie for that rim shop...
 

Paul M. Weir

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Notice the 2 "patches" just below the turret roof line, clearly the kids wrecked it at least once. The patch at the base (under the vision block and pistol port) is standard though.

As for colour, the Soviets used green shades that were much brighter than what we might be used to on military vehicles in the West. Their WW2 aircraft green was quite bilious. I suppose one way to look at it is that the Soviets tried to match the green of daylit grass or trees rather than the shades that matched vegetation in shadow.
 

Justiciar

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Notice the 2 "patches" just below the turret roof line, clearly the kids wrecked it at least once. The patch at the base (under the vision block and pistol port) is standard though.

As for colour, the Soviets used green shades that were much brighter than what we might be used to on military vehicles in the West. Their WW2 aircraft green was quite bilious. I suppose one way to look at it is that the Soviets tried to match the green of daylit grass or trees rather than the shades that matched vegetation in shadow.
Not directly related to Soviet colors...but as I understand it...and Paul will correct me...when crews repainted their vehicles say from winter white wash...to "summer"...the mixed pigment with "thinner" in the field and sprayed it on...so how one crew mixed this (given materials) vs another crews is a moveable feast...where as at the shop coming off the line..there is more of a paint guru...and better ratios of tint to thinner...likely better compressor and air brush specialist etc...

Still the Soviet artist's eye seems off...this is not Russian Olive...this is just green pigment No. 2 mixed with mineral spirits by Vassily...WHO drank 1/8 os said spirit before applying the the coat of paint...

The real secret of the Tiger I was not its gun...rather its crew could spot Russian tanks at 1,000 meters b/c of this paint job...
 

Paul M. Weir

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The problem with figuring out Soviet colours is the relative lack of colour photographs. In addition early colour photography had severe problems is capturing true colours. Not that modern film or digital colour reproduction is perfect, just better.

I have seen reports (however true) that within a tank brigade you could see the proverbial Forty Shades Of Green. In such reports I have seen reference to tanks painted with civilian tractor green and such like. As Soviet industry recovered from the evacuations, that became less common and uniform colours became the norm.

As for winter white wash schemes, they were usually were literally "white wash". Such schemes were usually water based pigments (like lime mixes) that didn't adhere very well over time. So at the end of snow conditions the white scheme was normally patchy and only needed a vigorous scrub to remove. In some cases when the temporary white was unavailable, civilian style oil based paint was used and would be harder to remove and would require overpainting, but that type was less common.

As to non winter colour schemes: Taking the German 3 colour scheme as an example, the base yellow was applied at the factory. The crew was supplied with tins of red brown, olive green and base yellow to allow the crews to camouflage according to local conditions (but note that from late '44 the 3 colour schemes were very often factory applied). It was up to the crews to supply the method (brush, spray or worn underpants on a stick) and the solvent. So the red-brown could vary from reddish deep chocolate brown to pink depending upon whether the pigment was mixed with petrol and applied with a rag or mixed with water and sprayed on, respectively. Factory applied schemes on the other hand were noted for their uniformity (eg so called ambush scheme). Allied to the uniformity of the late war factory schemes you could see colours not in the standard repertoire, like many Hetzers (Czech) that had locally sourced pigments.
 

Justiciar

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Barrel extension, and its droop at just before the muzzle break....or the gun mantle redo...

(or 2mm reduction in the commander's hatch through bolt?HA! Got you Paul M. Weir.... ;))
 

jrv

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Taking a second look at the tank, there are (at least) two modifications, done at different times by different owners I think.

JR
 
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