AP163 Dingoes At Damour - AAR

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AP163 Dingoes At Damour - AAR

18043

Scenario Overview:

From the latest Action Pack #16, being tournament-sized and somewhat unusual in pitting Vichy French vs. Australian with tankettes and Carriers in Syria 1941, probably this scenario will see numerous playings. At least it has recently. My Australian mentor proposed to play this one, so I happily obliged and - needless to say - let him have the Australians.

All buildings are Wooden, one is added per overlay, and have a ground level only with Rowhouse bars N/A. Offboard terrain exists as printed. Despite being 2nd line, the Australians do not Cower by SSR - note these are ANZAC (A25.44) and thus also Stealthy unless Green. The French armored trucks are radio-equipped and have Speacial Ammo AP increased to 11.

The objective of the Australians is to gain Control of Building Locations. So those not familiar with the difference between 'Building Control' and 'Control of Building Locations' should read up the appropriate rules to avoid unhappy surprises.


Preliminary Assessment:

My opponent remarked that this scenario is a 'typical Andrew Rodgers' design. Of course, I inquired what made it 'typical'. My opponent answered that many of Andrew Rodgers' designs feature engagements in which most of the forces involved tend to struggle with each other at rather short distances. I wish I could express myself more succinctly, as this description fits a very wide range of ASL scenarios, but I understood what my opponent meant. I have just recently played AP150 The Sangshak Redemption, also an Andrew Rodgers design which had this similar characteristic. So - learned something new even before I began play.

The Vichy French defenders have 10 squads (1 elite, 9 first line), 3 Leaders, a MMG, 2 LMG, a 60mm MTR and a 75* ART piece plus Crew with a scant Special Ammo of AP5 and possibly useful s6. 8 Concealment Counters and 3 Foxholes provide some extra cover. In French Turn 2, two armored trucks arrive. True tin cans with an AF of 0 all around. With 23MP, these are only quick on roads. Their 37* Gun is a threat to any British AFV, but the difficulty will lie in hitting them.

The Australians begin with an onboard force of 12 2nd Line squads (not subject to Cowering by SSR) led by four Leaders and only equipped with light if ample SW consisting of 4 LMG, 3 50mm MTRs, and 2 ATRs. Given the likely close-range fighting and the French armor that barely deserves the name, the number of these SW might defeat the enemy armored trucks by themselves.
But then, there is also the 'cavalry' entering no Turn 1 along the South (left) consisting of 3 Carriers with their inherent half-squads and removable weapons and two Mk VIB tankettes, which will be the 'kings of the battlefield' under the given circumstances with their 10FP CMG and their two TK rolls vs. vehicles. All Australian AFV have Smoke Dispensers as well. Last but not least, the Australian vehicles are fast offroad and can move about just anywhere in short order.

The playing area consists of two boards of which roughly 2/3 of the space are 'onboard'. The western (top) board 35 is dominated by Orchards and Grain. Roughly in the center sit the buildings which are contested. The eastern (bottom) board 58 is dominated by a large hill. Board 58 will only play a minor role because the Orchards an lack of upper building levels severely curtail LOS to the relevant areas so that the usual advantage of the high ground is hardly significant in this scenario. Most of the action will take place in the northern (right) half of board 35.

The omnipresent Orchards will greatly impact how this scenario plays. It means that most fighting will be at close range because otherwise the cumulative hindrances of the Orchards makes fire ineffective. Besides the contested Buildings, there is not much Rout Terrain in the relevant area except for a few small patches of Woods on the eastern and western fringes of board 35. This does have a great impact on the attacker and also on the setup of the defence.

Theoretically, the French setup area would allow quite a lot of room for a forward or flanking setup on board 35. The question is: Why would one want to do that?
Of course, the answer would be to delay the Aussie approach. But the scarcity of Rout Terrain has already been mentioned as has been the attackers capability to outmaeuver the defenders almost at will. As the defender must defend the buildings to win, he could at best put some of his units further up front. As soon as they break, they will be in dire straits to rout anywhere and are very likely to be cut off and overrun in short order.
Therefore, I see no sense for a forward defensive setup but interestingly, I have observed a game on VASL in which the Vichy tried just that. I did not have the opportunity to follow that game in detail, it was not over quickly. But I cannot report the reasons why it lasted. Maybe future plays will show if there is any benefit in such a defensive setup, but I doubt it will do against a proficient attacker.
Consequently, I'd expect a defender to 'build a castle' around the buildings. These at least provide the best TEM around and force the enemy to close if this protection is not to be further enhanced by Orchard hindrances while losing Orchard hindrance protection themselves the closer they come. Once the attackers are broken, though, they are facing the issue of Rally Terrain. Broken attackers could likey use Low Crawl or might not even be required to Rout at all - but in proximity of the defenders, they aren't likely to rally quickly either. If they instead rout back to some woods, it might be a long way to get there - and back into action once recuperated. This might be one of the factors this scenario hinges on.

Another point is the danger of being eliminated for Failure to Rout for the French defenders. It is very easy for the Australians get into the back of the French quickly with the AFV and soon thereafter with Infantry under the cover of the Orchards. Generally, there is precious little the French can do to delay the Australian approach due to the Orchards except if they are ready to sacrifice some of their defenders up front which probably brings more harm than gain.

The Australians must make the best out of the opportunities provided to them by their AFV - and these offer plenty. They have to think up a plan how to best rally broken forces. And more importantly attempt not to be broken in numbers during their approach. This becomes ever more difficult the closer they get to the French. A lot might hinge on whether the Australians find SMOKE for their 3 Mortars or how the sDs may work - or not. The Diggers have a slight advantage in CC as - being ANZAC troops unless Green - they are Stealthy, which is beneficial for Ambush. CC, however, is always a fickle thing. In some cases a unit bound in Melee might be just fine as it will not be able to fire anywere allowing other friendly units to close in. Then, there is the French ART piece to be reckoned with. It has thorough punch vs. the Australian Infantry, but the Australian AFV might neutralize it easily to have it finished off by following up footsloggers. The French armored trucks could be potent, but it is very questionable if they last long. I would not bet on it. Last but not least, there are some outlying buildings that the Australians must take care of. This should best be done in short order because if Australian assets are tied up for long in securing them, this will lessen the pressure they can put on the central buildings.


Situation at the Start of Australian Turn 1 - Game Start:

18065

The Battle Plan:

Having dismissed the idea for deploying some French forward because I was convinced the benefit of a short delayed would be outweighed by losing units to quickly in the process, I settled on a classic 'castle' defence around the central buildings where I also placed the foxholes to create sort of a connection between the buildings. To divert at least some of the Australian attackers for a while, a small force defended the 35Y10 building with the intention of falling back to the center if the situation allowed - which I did not really count on. The reinforcements in form of my two armored trucks would also move to the center to threaten enemy AFV which I expected to show up in my rear area to interfere with routing.

My French would keep fire discipline and retain concealment which would make them difficult to harm. When the Australians had come very close, I'd open up at short range in the hope of breaking as many of the attackers as possible, buying time for me when they struggled to regain Good Order, which would not be easy close to my defenders or cost them time routing back to the few patches of Woods and moving to the front again.

Since my defenders are bunched together, it would be kind of difficult to discern anything (which might be a trouble for later pictures as well), so I have only expanded part of the stacks in the above picture and will provide dispositions for the others in the following:

35X6: 458+LMG
35Y6: 457+LMG
35Y7: 9-1, 457+MMG
35Z5: 457 (in Foxhole), 75*ART+228 (HIP, CA: 35X5)
35Z7: 457

The attackers would close in quickly, I'd slug it out, and just hang on long enough to deny Australian victory. Not much subtlety here.


Situation at the End of Australian Turn 1:

18067

A quick 1st Australian Turn. The Australians closed in unopposed, I did nothing at all.

The attack came in with a strong western (top) flank, where the Australians pushed forward with their two best Leaders (9-1 and 8-1), all 4 LMGs, and the two Mk VIB tankettes.

In the center came two lt. MTRs, an ATR and the 8-0 with roughly half of the Australian Infantry force.

This left the Carriers for the eastern (bottom) flank on the hill with the 3rd lt. MTR, the 7-0 Leader and a small Infantry force apparently aiming for the 35Y10 building or for a flanking move into my rear area.


Situation at the End of Vichy French Turn 1:

18068

My French Turn 1 was, again, a very quick one.

My 9-1, 457+MMG in 35Y7 broke one enemy squad.

The Australians acquired 35X6 with one of their lt. MTRs and assembled another one atop the hill.


To be coninued in a subsequent post...

von Marwitz
 
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Situation at the End of Australian Turn 2:

18073

During Australian Turn 2, my opponent wasted no time to close in.

Both Australian lt. MTRs in the center looked for and found SMOKE, bringing it down in 35X5 and 35X9 to great effect.

Then the enemy Infantry moved it, forming one great line in the center. On the western (top) flank, the 9-1, 447+LMG took the first outlying building, supported by a neighboring 447+LMG. The 8-1, 447+LMG moved towards the central buildings from the flank as did the fourth 447+LMG. This was, in fact, a perfect reflection of historical British small unit tactics. The only thing not in the 'textbook' was that my ART piece broke the 8-1 and his LMG squad. However, this also revealed my Gun position to him. Both Mk VIB tankettes circled around my rear in a long arc, apparently intending to impede possible Rout Paths for the French, just as I had feared and anticipated.
The Carriers decended from the hill while one half-squad with lt. MTR stayed behind, setting up to engage my forces around 35Y10.

Due to the Smoke, my fire was hindered and both the 457+LMG in Y6 as well as my 9-1, 457+MMG gacked their rolls to my chagrin. My 60mm MTR failed to its enemy counterpart atop the hill.

As one huge enemy Firegroup broke my 458+LMG in 35X6 during Advancing Fire, my plan to break the enemy in numbers when he moved in close seemed to fall apart from the outset.

During the Rout Phase, the broken Aussi 8-1, 447+LMG routed back all the way to V1, while my broken 458+LMG routed back just a single hex to where my 9-1 was located. Due to the tankettes, not much more would have been possible anyway.

A 447 advanced into the first building Location in the center, protected by its own SMOKE and now ADJACENT to my 'killer stack' and broken elite squad.

So far, I felt more than the spectator rather than an actor in this scenario.


Situation at the End of Vichy French Turn 2:

18076

During the Rally Phase of my Vichy French Turn 2, unfortunately I did not manage to rally anyone. The Australians were not lucky either - only their 8-0 in 35V1 came back.

During Prep Fire, my 60mm MTR, having previously established double Acquisition on its counterpart atop the hill now tried to settle scores - and failed miserably. Its crew somehow deserved to be broken by the Australian mortar after I had failed to get any results after no less than four shots. In the center, I was somewhat more successful by breaking two 447+LMG in 35Y3 and a halfsquad in 35X5. My ART piece failed to hit with two not very artful shots.

Now, my pair of armored trucks was due to enter. I had one drive onboard in 35GG1 and the other along the road from the North (right) of board 35. I did not have much confidence in these tin cans in an AF of 0, so I wanted to keep them a bit out of the way of the Australian AFVs, which would be fast enough to close in if they had the desire to do so. In this turn, I used them to provide some support for the 35AA4 and 35BB5 buildings, which were merely scantily held by a Dummy, a single 8-0, and one squad. Subsequently, I planned for them to cover my ART piecefor as long as they'd make it. This seemed not be too long as one of my armored trucks was stunned by the enemy LMG in Z2 right away. Except for some minor shuffling, my Vichy French Infantry stayed put.

With some Australians now broken hat would have been useful in creaing large Fire Groups for my opponent, his defensive fire was not as effective as it could have been. It also wasn't helpful for him that his dice weren't playing along.

My broken 458+LMG routed back one hex with the 9-1 - there would not be much retreating further...
The recent Australian brokies routed back all the way to 35V1, where a veritable pile of them had assembled.

I advanced a Concealed squad into X6 vs. an unconcealed but stealthy (ANZAC) one. If this was a sensible decision may be open to debate. My Ambush modifiers were only marginally better that those of the enemy, the odds even. I did it anyway in the hope of either killing off my opponent or to create a Melee which would inhibit the future movement of the Australians a bit. In any case I failed to Ambush the Australians and decided not to make an attack at all to retain concealment. No one was hurt in this initial round, both sides were marked with CC (hopefully, we did this correctly).


Situation at the End of Australian Turn 3:

18088

At the start of Australian Turn 3 my opponent rallied one 447+LMG in 35V1 and one 436 in 35T5. I got back my important 458+LMG in 35Z6.

Prep Fire saw the Australians finding Smoke for their 50mm MTR once again - not once but twice. Both Smoke rounds successfully came down in 35Y6 and 35Z5, blinding a squad and, more importantly, my ART piece. With 35X6 still in Smoke from the previous turn and CC ongoing, now three of the hexes most important for my defence were shrouded. Much to my chagrin, my 457+LMG in 35Z6 was broken. This made my hold in the most important patch of buildings precarious. Having been stunned the previous turn, one of my armored trucks now got taken out by an LMG shot before having achieved anything besides driving onboard.

The Australians wasted no time and closed in aggressively. One of the tankettes overran my Gun, which survived but was neutralized by the vehicle staying in its hex. The second tankette followed but was stopped cold and killed by a point blank MG shot in AA6 much to my relief. Luckily, I was also able to break three more Australian squads as my opponent seemed not to be able to pass any MC forced on him. He did, however create a Hero which was just the thing I did not need, because a negative modifier to multihex firegroups would be powerful in this scenario.

On the eastern (bottom) flank, the building in 35Y10 was captured by the enemy employing the Carriers, but I still had a squad and a 7-0 Leader nearby. My MTR half-squad was killed when No Quarter was declared soon thereafter.

Worse, though, was the CCPh: I lost two full squads with nothing to show for it in the central patch of buildings, which was a severe setback for me given the pressure I was under in that area.


Situation at the End of Vichy French Turn 3:

18089

In my Vichy French Turn 3, rallies for both sides weren't really successful. The Australians got back on 436+LMG into action.

Alas, I could not inflict much damage on the Australians with my fire because despite being ADJACENT, some of his units were difficult to harm due to the cumulative TEM of the Buildings and Smoke. I did break an enemy squad, though and killed the newly minted Hero, which had - for a short time - been of great concern to me.

My MMG in 35Y7 remained in action but received an Encircling shot.

Routing became ever more difficult, but yet, I had lost no one to Failure to Rout. But it was forseeable, that this very thing would begin to happen very soon...

Alas, my ART piece went down in CC to the powerful MG of the Mk VIB.

I had no good feeling about the outcome of this scenario...


To be continued in a subsequent post.

von Marwitz
 
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Situation at the End of Australian Turn 4:

18097

In Australian Turn 4, my opponent attempted to force the decision in the center.

I cannot remember exactly, which of the enemies units rallied but it can't have been more than two squad equivalents. No rallies for the French.

In the center, Prep Fire took out my important MMG squad in 35Y7, which had previously suffered an Encirclement shot. Things looked quite grim there as I knew perfectly well that during the upcoming MPh, I would be swarmed.

This is exactly what happened. First, the surviving Mk VIB which was acquired by my ADJACENT armored truck but still shrouded in Smoke made good its escape, winging around 35W6 and W7 to bypass-freeze my 9-1, 457+LMG and brokie in 35Z7. I managed to take it out with CC Reaction fire turning it into a Burning Wreck, which also served of neutralizing this position of mine because now the French were shrouded in Smoke. Now the Australians crept up from every direction with the intention of advancing into CC later. They even were so audacious to drive a Carrier into bypas of 35Z7 and unload into my hex to force FPF on me with the hope of breaking everyone. A devious ploy, which luckily failed.

On the bright side, my two squads in 35Z4 and 35AA4 held firm and did some damage to the Australians coming in from the West (top) - somehow 35V1 seemed always to be full of Australian brokies.
On the eastern flank (bottom) my 7-0 and 457 in 35W9 were attacked by various units, the Leader taking a lethal wound in the process. My squad, however, held on and broke an Australian half-squad+ATR which had dismounted from a Carrier and moved ADJACENT.

During the Rout Phase, one French squad in the center buildings died for Failure to Rout.

In the Advance Phase, enemy units crowded in on 35Z7 for a 2:1 CC attack. Both sides failed to do any damage, though, so Melee ensued.

Nevertheless, this halfturn had been costly with the Vichy French losing a 7-0 Leader and 1.5 squad equivalents while I could gnaw away thee half-squad of the Australians, one of which died due to unfortunate Fate.


Situation at the End of Vichy French Turn 4:

18098

Vichy French Turn 4 saw no French rallies as there were no surviving brokies. The broken Australians, having gotten a taste of the French dogged resistance, felt not inclined to rejoin the battle and remained broken. This had become a problem for them as it took considerable steam out of their assault.

My French were determined not to let them recover. Alas, my Prep Fire vs. 35Y7, where an Australian HS had picked up my MMG had no effect. The 457 in the 35Z4 Foxhole re-DM'ed the Australian brokie in 35V4.

During Movement, I set my armored truck to unsettle all the Australian brokies in V1. Alas, I could not reach V2, because the LMG in 35Z2 destroyed it. Its Crew got out but was killed of by an ADJACENT enemy half-squad. That friggin' LMG was successful in first stunning one and then killing both armored trucks. Buggery!
My 35AA4 squad skulked, the 35W9 squad Assault Moved to 35X9 to re-DM the brokies in the 35Y10 building and to chase them away.

Australian Final Fire was ineffective, but then, there was not very much of it.

The Rout Phase saw yet more Australians piling into 35V1 and the 35Y10 Builiding abandoned.

I advanced in to retake the 35Y10 building and into 35Y6 to take on the Australian 237+MMG (captured) with a full French squad. I withdrew from the 35Z4 Foxhole to the ADJACENT one on 35Z5.

In CC, to my chagrin, that 237+MMG (captured) ambushed me and withdrew. On the other hand, in 35Z7, the Australians failed again to take out my valiant French defenders despite their 2:1 advantage - they did lethally wound my 9-1 Leader, though.

Somehow, the Australians still had failed to get the upper hand.


Situation at the End of Australian Turn 5:

Apparently, I have neglected to save a picture of the situation at the end of this Turn.
Oh, the suspense... How will things look at the End of Vichy French Turn 5?


Situation at the End of Vichy French Turn 5:

18099

Lo and behold! There is still fight in the Vichy French in their last 5th Turn with one more halfturn left for the Australians.

With the numbers of the valiant French dwindling, this was a quick halfturn. Basically what had happened is that my 458+LMG in 35Y5 was broken and died for Failure to Rout. The French 457 which had taken position in 35Z5 was also broken and out of commission. Against all odds, a single 457+LMG still brawled on in Melee against 4:10 odds in 35Z7 in a case of 'extreme Bud-Spencer&Terence-Hill'ing' to the immense frustration of my opponent. But what else should they do? It was the Australians that had declared No Quarter before - else they might have surrendered... ;):LOL:

Another formidable cause for frustration for the Australians was that the situation of rallying the brokies in 35V1 never ever seemed to get anywhere. He got back a measly Green half-squad and just before chances seemed to improve, the French Sniper came down on the whole damn zoo with disasterous effects: Random selection killed a Leader and wounded the other, which caused a LLMC on the whole broken lot, eliminating two half-squads and re-DM'ing the rest. A total shambles!

On the eastern (bottom) flank, my 457 squad had somehow contrieved to break all the enemy Infantry that was down there, squarely sitting in a very French building that the Australians just had to recapture for the win.

Yet, it seemed that the Australians would have the edge for their last upcoming Turn. Sometime, the Melee would just have to end at the given odds. Merely a lone 8-0 Vichy French Leader held the building in 35AA4. There were still some Australian troopers around to engage the French squad in 35CC5. And on the eastern flank (bottom) chances were that the enemy would freeze my with his Carrier, rally a squad in 58G10 and selfrally another squad down there to overcome me in 35Y10. But it would be a tense finale...


Situation at the End of Australian Turn 6 - Game End:

18102

In their last Turn 6, the Australians awaited the Rally Phase with apprehension. One squad came back in 35V1, but was somewhat away from the action. On the eastern (bottom) flank, the full squad in 58G10 failed to rally but a full squad in 58M10 did self-rally.

There was nothing much the Vichy French could do but hope for the best. As the Australians moved in from every direction, the Defensive First Fire of my last remaining two squads in 35CC5 and 35Y10 had no effect. Down on the eastern flank, the remaining Carrier unloaded into my hex, allowing the rest of the Australians to close in unimpeded.

Advancing Fire, much to my relief, did not break any of my valiant defenders, though the squad on the eastern flank (bottom) Pinned, which would be bad for CC. Hex 35Z7 proved to be just a hellish one for the Australians as the Flame, which had spread from the burning Mk VIB turned into a Terrain Blaze, breaking up the Melee with everyone breaking and routing out to escape the fire. Still, this gave the Australians Control of that Building Location as they Controlled the majority of hexes around.

So the last, dreaded CC Phase came. My lone 8-0 Leader in 35AA4 went down in 1:6 odds thrown against him. Yet, his sacrifice had not been in vain so far as these enemy units would otherwise have been free to occupy themselves with something else. Next, the 9-1, 447+LMG, 237 which had advanced in vs my 457 rolled for Ambush at -1 Stealthy (ANZAC) and -1 Leadership. They rolled a 6. My opponent remarked that if I now rolled a 1, this would win me the game. I had just thought the same thing. And rolled a 1 to withdraw to 35BB4 snatching victory from the jaws of defeat! Just to see the outcome, we did resolve the CC on the eastern (bottom) flank which was at 3:2 odds against me. Here, too, the Australians failed to kill my squad.

Vichy French win.

To be continued in a subsequent post.

von Marwitz
 
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Review:

18103

18104

Above are shown Vichy French and Australian losses. The French lost both armored Trucks, the British lost both Mk VIB tankettes.

It was a very tense game that came down to the penultimate CC/Ambush roll. However, I have to note that my opponent just rolled miserably bad. I believe he had a DR average of above 7.6 in more than 90 rolls. His units kept breaking and not rallying. And he was just cursed in being unable to conclude the Melee in 35Z7, in which the odds greatly favored him, tying down 2.5 of his squad equivalents until the end. Furthermore, I was quite lucky in taking out both of his tankettes.

On the other hand, he was quite lucky with his Smoke. Four hexes where shrouded just when and where it was needed, greatly hindering my defence. My armored trucks did hardly anything - the first one went down before he got an opportunity, the second in the attempt of exploiting one. They were all killed by one and the same LMG. That said, I don't believe that these armored trucks will ever have a long lifespan with an AF of 0 all around and 4 LMGs, 2 ATRs and 2 tankettes being around.

My initial assessment proved to be correct in that the Australian AFV can move around quickly almost at will, being able to greatly interfere with French Rout paths. It seemed also correct that the biggest Australian problem is standing up to close range fire and then to get back their units to Good Order given the scarcity of Rallying Terrain. Getting or not getting Smoke will make a tremendous difference for the Australians. They can use their AFV splendidly to freeze/suppress selected French positions, namely the French ART piece which may not set up in buildings.

Still, I'd be interested working variants of a defence that differs from my 'castle' approach. With 'normal' dice rolls, the outcome would have been an Australian win. The question is, if this had differed if he had had less Smoke successfully placed, which I doubt in the end.

The scenario is well suited for tournament play, but I think that it is more fun to play for the attacking Australians.

von Marwitz
 

PabloGS

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Thanks for the write up!

I am currently playing this by email, and I went with the full forward defense with the Vichians. We will see what happens.
 

bprobst

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the Flame, which had spread from the burning Mk VIB turned into a Terrain Blaze, breaking up the Melee with everyone breaking and routing out to escape the fire.
Well, the Flame becoming a Blaze does indeed break everyone in the Location. However, because they were all locked in Melee, no-one goes anywhere until they attempt to withdraw in the CCPh. Unfortunately for them, they have all burnt alive by that point. Blaze + Melee = Death.
 

von Marwitz

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Well, the Flame becoming a Blaze does indeed break everyone in the Location. However, because they were all locked in Melee, no-one goes anywhere until they attempt to withdraw in the CCPh. Unfortunately for them, they have all burnt alive by that point. Blaze + Melee = Death.
"B25.4 ENTRANCE/EXIT: Infantry in a terrain Blaze must leave by the end of the next RtPh or be eliminated. Unbroken units unable to leave before that RtPh have the option of breaking voluntarily so as to rout out of the Blaze Location. A non-pinned unit that cannot break voluntarily (A10.41) may move during its RtPh into an Accessible Location just as if it were Withdrawing from Melee (A11.2-.21) even if berserk. [EXC: units in Melee/pinned may not leave during the RtPh and are eliminated]. Such units are vulnerable to Interdiction (as well as minefield/OBA attack) and ATTACKER units must still move first. Vehicular/Cavalry units in a terrain Blaze must leave in their next friendly MPh or be eliminated. Any ground unit that enters a terrain Blaze is eliminated. The occupants of a pillbox (although in a separate Location) are considered fully affected by any Blaze in the ground level of its hex."

Good point, Bruce! We have overlooked that.

Luckily, no harm done as this would not have made a difference with regard to the Control of the Building Hex in question in our game.

von Marwitz
 

Andrew Rogers

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LOL it was a disaster. I lost half my force by turn 2. WIsh I had seen your AAR before playing!
Hi. Sorry the "Dingoes at Damour" scenario ended quickly. Hope you will have more fun the next time you are playing.

A comment was made earlier about this scenario being a "typical Andrew Rogers" design. If you are playing the defender in a scenario I designed there is a fair chance that "up front" defences is a low odds option. My advice is to use "sacrificial" pickets (ie. half squads) and dummies to slow down and channel the defenders into preferred areas. Your main line of resistance (MLR) is often behind the front edge of your set up area.

The other observation above with respect to a "typical Andrew Rogers" scenario was the inevitable close quarter nature of these encounters. Correct. Bring your bayonet and make sure it is sharpened. I am partially inspired by the "knife scene" from the Aussie movie "Crocodile Dundee" ... Thats not a knife - Crocodile Dundee - YouTube

Andy Rogers
 

Mister T

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The other observation above with respect to a "typical Andrew Rogers" scenario was the inevitable close quarter nature of these encounters.
Andy, your designs are good enough. No need to defend them. No need to give tips. Let your scenarios live their own life, you can be confident people will recognise their value.
It's a solid pack. I'm looking forward to playing more of 'em.
 

PabloGS

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Hi. Sorry the "Dingoes at Damour" scenario ended quickly. Hope you will have more fun the next time you are playing.

A comment was made earlier about this scenario being a "typical Andrew Rogers" design. If you are playing the defender in a scenario I designed there is a fair chance that "up front" defences is a low odds option. My advice is to use "sacrificial" pickets (ie. half squads) and dummies to slow down and channel the defenders into preferred areas. Your main line of resistance (MLR) is often behind the front edge of your set up area.

The other observation above with respect to a "typical Andrew Rogers" scenario was the inevitable close quarter nature of these encounters. Correct. Bring your bayonet and make sure it is sharpened. I am partially inspired by the "knife scene" from the Aussie movie "Crocodile Dundee" ... Thats not a knife - Crocodile Dundee - YouTube

Andy Rogers
It is a good scenario no doubt. I simply missed the deadliness of the overruns by the British AFVs. If they come where your gun is not it is trouble.

Now I am starting AP175 Forest Gumm and AP169 Beast have Arrived.
 

PabloGS

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It is a good scenario no doubt. I simply missed the deadliness of the overruns by the British AFVs. If they come where your gun is not it is trouble.

Now I am starting AP175 Forest Gumm and AP169 Beast have Arrived.

Having finished one of these and close to the end of the other, now I understand what "Typical Andrew Rogers" means ;).

A lot of firepower, mixed forces, and a super tight schedule. This means that the scenario will be fast, and furious, and that if the defender sets up too far forward it will get totally wrecked.

Very exciting scenarios by the way. Kudos to Andy!
 

Stewart

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Hi. Sorry the "Dingoes at Damour" scenario ended quickly. Hope you will have more fun the next time you are playing.

A comment was made earlier about this scenario being a "typical Andrew Rogers" design.

Andy Rogers
Kindling is NA left off intentionally? :sneaky::sneaky:
 

von Marwitz

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Kindling is NA left off intentionally? :sneaky::sneaky:
I don't think that Kindling would make much of a difference.

Most of the Terrain is Orchards, which are extremely difficult to set on fire (Kindling # is 11) and slow to spread (Spreading # is 9). The French Defenders will to have time for setting fire to the countryside.

At the same time, the terrain which is easier to kindle is that what the French need to hold. The buildings. Nearby Brush ADCACENT to the central patch of buildings might be set on fire (Kindling # of 9) and if burning, might spread quickly (Spreading # of 6), however, the French do not want to endanger the Buildings they need to defend and offer them the highest TEM against the attacking Australians.

von Marwitz
 

Stewart

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I don't think that Kindling would make much of a difference.

Most of the Terrain is Orchards, which are extremely difficult to set on fire (Kindling # is 11) and slow to spread (Spreading # is 9). The French Defenders will to have time for setting fire to the countryside.

At the same time, the terrain which is easier to kindle is that what the French need to hold. The buildings. Nearby Brush ADCACENT to the central patch of buildings might be set on fire (Kindling # of 9) and if burning, might spread quickly (Spreading # of 6), however, the French do not want to endanger the Buildings they need to defend and offer them the highest TEM against the attacking Australians.

von Marwitz
Kindling Final DR is an 9 with Leadership. Roughly a 62% chance of flame given the right resources.
Spreading is an 8.
Flames can be suppressed.
 

von Marwitz

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Kindling Final DR is an 9 with Leadership. Roughly a 62% chance of flame given the right resources.
Spreading is an 8.
Flames can be suppressed.
I know. But still you need to 'make' it. Then a Flame needs to spread into a Blaze if your intention is to somehow inhibit the attackers. The scenario only has 5 1/2 Turns. Finally, the Brush close to the Buildings is in your rear, which might end up screwing your Rout Paths in the event a Blaze develops, which will likely help the enemy more than you.

Trust me, your leaders and infantry will have other things to do in this one...

von Marwitz
 
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