Check out our friends and Affiliates
Home    News    Features    Op-Eds    Reviews    Videos    Downloads    Games A-Z    |    Groups    Blogs    Forums    Chat Rooms    |    Staff    Contact Us    Help
Join the discussion today!

Feed aggregator

I just learned how to silence Fanboys:

Forums: Latest Threads - Tue, 09/02/2014 - 21:13
Facts! Yep, simple unadulterated, unbiased facts. Once again I called out the Fanboys and of course they immediately called me an 'asshat' and whatnot for stating that CIG (Star Citizen) doesn't follow it's own guidelines and bans people willy-nilly. So I simply challenged them to ask CIG why 'Joda' was banned without the requisite warning? And the response? Eerie silence. Nothing....not a single peep. The only response was simply more hostility from more Fanboys. Sad.

Riddick:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g0ZRNLw2omA
Categories: Forums

Panther Games to Change Publishers

Forums: Latest Threads - Tue, 09/02/2014 - 00:05
Panther Games will be changing publishers at the end of October 2014. It has signed an agreement with another publisher to publish both its computer and board games. We will announce the new publisher soon.


PG Logo Gold on Black.jpg

Panther will be leaving Matrix Games with a lot of good will. The Command Ops Public Forum at Matrix Games will remain available to customers after the transition and support through Matrix Games will continue until the end of October 2014. While not expected, should any future updates to the titles sold through Matrix be required, they would also be compatible with the Matrix Games releases.


Mr Dave O’Connor, President of Panther Games, said “We have been with Matrix Games for ten years and have enjoyed working with them. We are looking forward to streamlining our arrangements for publishing both our computer and board games. We wish Matrix Games all the best for the future.”


Canberra, Australia. 2 September 2014
www.panthergames.com Attached Images
Categories: Forums

Gaming Industry Under Siege??

Forums: Latest Threads - Sat, 08/30/2014 - 02:44
Over the past two days I have become aware of several large scandals exploding across parts of the gaming world. One is about gaming journalism and the other is about threats to a female gamer and her criticism of the portrayal of women in video games. Another issue that was brushed under the rug was a gamer being "swatted" on live stream whilst playing Counter-Strike. While I am still sifting through the debris it is important to point out that the gaming community appears to be actively drawing lines and firing on all cylinders at each other over various issues.

For example, Anita Sarkeesian is known for a series Feminist Frequency (FemFreq for short). She recently did a mini-series detailing the portrayal of women in video games. Almost immediately she came under extremely harsh backlash that even targeted her personally (death and rape threats as well as the release of her and her parent's addresses). She was forced to leave her home (apparently) under the advice of the FBI whom she contacted in relation to the threats. However, some have claimed that her videos steal content from other content creators without crediting them, spew out fallacies, misconstrue games, and outright lie about them. So the community is split. But, I wholly disagree with those who believe she is getting her just deserves for misinforming people about games. They just that, GAMES. To go so far as to sit back and let people threaten her and her family's lives is as disgusting as those making the threats and it just really reinforces the gamin community's issue with female gamers, characters, and the enormous amounts of misogyny that exist.

Here is Pt. 2 over her series:



The other is about terrible gaming journalism, specifically between Kotaku and Plygon. I honestly just discovered this minutes ago so I cannot really comment on it as much as I did above:

From Gamer Headlines:
Quote: A few days ago I posted an article that discussed in no small part the importance of standards within journalistic media. Gaming journalism is currently enduring a colossal change in tides that has seen several big names within the industry heavily criticised for acts of non-disclosure, censorship, as well the burial and with-holding of information. This string of events has been primarily publicised, fought for and evidenced by the gaming community itself, who have over-come all attempts to prevent the matter from spreading further.

Unfortunately, those attempts to quell the spread of information only served to infuriate and further encourage many gamers to continue calling out press regarding ethical negligence. Today, two more popular writers found themselves on the receiving end of strongly worded criticisms regarding the unreasonable overlap of personal relationships and publications.

Patricia Hernandez (@xpatriciah), writer at Kotaku, and Ben Kuchera (@BenKuchera), editor at Polygon, have been scalded this evening as Reddit users diverted to a highly detailed account of articles in which the two writers had failed to disclose personal interests prior to publishing their work. The accusation is especially scalding since it directly contradicts the recently stated ethical expectations of Kotaku editor-in-chief, Stephen Totilo (stephentotilo).

Read The Rest: Here So, what are everyone's thoughts on the subjects? I can already guess that many here agree that gamin journalism is the shits and I know that this is a hugely commonly understood fact from throughout the gaming community as evidenced across multiple forums I visit.

As for the issues with Sarkeesian, it is much trickier I feel. I have seen people criticize her content in other videos but agree that the backlash is totally unnecessary and just wrong. Others have stated that she deserves it which is enabling this form of disgusting cyber-based behaviour. I find it appalling that people are basically okaying those actions. Another thing is is that, as stated in the article from Gamer Headlines, the gaming industry has not major impact on world politics and economics, and etc. It is a purely entertainment industry first, and a possible educator second. However there are parts of it that undoubtedly require oversight. Both of these examples are important for the industry/hobby in moving forward. And to adequately tackle them every single tier of the industry MUST take part in open conversations about what to do and where to go. I feel that the industry is one of the few that can really shift and direct itself as a whole, along new paths. Yet, this requires its participants to understand and realize that mature, open, and honest debate is needed and childish trolling and threats are unfounded and should be accompanied by severe consequences.
Categories: Forums

CCP Closing SF Office

Forums: Latest Threads - Thu, 08/28/2014 - 21:05
From Blues News:

http://www.bluesnews.com/s/154519/ccp-closing-sf-office


Quote: CCP Closing SF Office

The latest financial report from CCP (in Icelandic, Adobe Acrobat format) reveals the EVE Online developer is closing its San Francisco office, and parting ways with former chief marketing officer David Reid and chief financial officer Joe Gallo. CCP explains they are looking to "combine and simplify" some operations, and Reddit notes that translating the report suggests flat revenues played into the decision. Thanks Eurogamer.net. And it is only going to get worse as Elite moves closer to release. Elite is the type of space game people have wanted for years. Eve Online was a good substitute...but just that: a substitute. If Elite launches in good shape, I expect to see Eve sub numbers crater rather quickly as all the "carebears" abandon the game, leaving the corp hardcore to fight it out in an increasingly empty universe.

PS: as if more proof is needed as to the mortal threat Elite will prove to be:

Categories: Forums

HPS Games

Latest Blogs - Tue, 08/26/2014 - 15:14
Originally Posted by Old Dog Good Day,

I have a number of HPS Simulations that I have listed on Amazon. Prices are either the lowest listed, or match the lowest listed.

Thanks for your consideration.
Old Dog

Panzer Campatigns

Tobruk '41

Ancient Wars

Roman Civil Wars

Squad Battles

Advance of the Reich

Tour of Duty

Early American Wars

War of 1812

French and Indian War

Naval Battles

Guadalcanal

Midway

Modern Air Power

War Over the MidEast

Civil War Campaigns

Chickamauga

Ozark

Napoleonic Battles

Austerlitz

Waterloo

Wagram

Thanks again.
Categories: Blogs

HPS Games

Latest Blogs - Sun, 08/24/2014 - 20:03
Originally Posted by Old Dog Good Day,

I have a number of HPS Simulations that I have listed on Amazon. Prices are either the lowest listed, or match the lowest listed.

Thanks for your consideration.
Old Dog

Panzer Campatigns

Tobruk '41

Ancient Wars

Roman Civil Wars

Squad Battles

Advance of the Reich

Tour of Duty

Early American Wars

War of 1812

French and Indian War

Naval Battles

Guadalcanal

Midway

Modern Air Power

War Over the MidEast

Civil War Campaigns

Chickamauga

Ozark

Napoleonic Battles

Eckmuhl

Austerlitz

Waterloo

Thanks again.
Categories: Blogs

The Not-So-Secret Secret World

Latest Blogs - Sun, 08/24/2014 - 17:09


I think one the greatest events in any gamer's life is that magical moment when he knows that he has discovered an original game universe, one that he intuitively knows he will be exploring and enjoying for a great many years to come. Such moments are unfortunately rare. Gaming is no different than other media, be it books, television, or movies: works of true genius are exceedingly rare, so such magical movements are few and far between. For me, I've only had two such gaming moments: when I first discovered the fantastically grim military science fiction setting that is Warhammer 40K,and now that I have belatedly discovered the wonderful Shadowrun universe (thanks to Harebrained Schemes fantastic PC translation).

When I first heard about the Shadowrun setting I was not all that interested because it seemed like such a weird mash-up of differing genres....

Shadowrun initially seems like your classic cyberpunk setting: a near future, a high tech dystopian world where mega-corporations rule with an iron fist due to their vast wealth and power. What is more, it is world where trans-humanism has become the norm, where people replace entire body parts with cybernetic enhancements, and can "jack in" and experience virtual reality in the same way as Neo experienced The Matrix. And, of course, it wouldn't be a cyberpunk setting without the crucial element of small time hustlers who run missions - "shadowruns" - for corporations, missions that can involve everything from corporate espionage, to outright hits on competing executives. Needless to say, these seemingly simple missions usually go very wrong for the runners in classic noir form, leading to some entertaining and grim scrambling for all involved. Good stuff!

But where Shadowrun throws a curve is by introducing a healthy dose of Tolkien into the mix. In 2011 "the Awakening" occurs, where a portion of humanity slowly mutates into the archetype fantasy races of dwarves, trolls, elves, etc. However, unlike their somewhat trippy portrayal in fantasy media, in the world of Shadowrun these races basically blend back into society as would any other racial subculture (I particularly like how trolls often come across as goombah Italians. LOL!). In addition to the genetic mutations, magic has also started to come back into the world, something that makes for a fascinating contrast with the setting's cyberpunk high technology. Of course, if you have the reappearance of the fantasy races, and you have the return of magic and wizardry, well, you can count on the reappearance of dragons, ancient horrors, vampires, and even the confirmation of urban legends like the existence of Big Foot and the Loch Ness Monster.

Like I said: "a weird mash-up" that never seemed like it would work. Let me tell you: it DOES! And in a big, addictive fashion! The world of Shadowrun is one of of those things that is simply greater than the sum of its parts. By taking such disparate genres as science fiction and fantasy, and by putting them together into the same Petri dish, you get a mix that is absolutely volatile with fascinating potential!

And I am now a rabid fan.

Since discovering this wonderful setting I have since learned that its generic name is "urban fantasy", a catchall term that denotes a modern city-based story that contains the elements of fantasy, sci-fi, and horror. It is, in short, a smorgasbord of imagination and escapism. I guess in retrospect it isn't a surprise why it has become so popular seeing how it spans so many genres. And popular it is. A quick search on Amazon reveals a growing library of urban fantasy titles (with a surprising number involving romances - I guess that is the Twilight phenom at work?). In fact, one of this year's Hugo Award winners is the urban fantasy title, Warbound: Book III of the Grimnoir Chronicles, by conservative author Larry Correia of the famed Monster Hunters International series of urban fantasy.

It looks like urban fantasy is here to stay. Huzzah!

Well, as it often the case with me, I am never just content to have fun with a single game. No, I immediately become restless and demand "more, more, more!" (in internet speak: "MOAR, MOAR, MOAR!"). And that is how I stumbled upon Funcom's MMORPG, The Secret World.

Well, "stumbled upon" might not be the precise term because this game had snagged my attention from the moment it's first teaser was unveiled back in 2011. It is a good one:


Truth is, as soon as the "dark days are coming" tag line appeared I was hooked. That is, unfortunately, my gut feeling too concerning the state of the world. I mean, when Ivy League universities offer a satanism major, when bloodthirsty heresies are on the march, when professors of the dark arts encourage the slaughter of the innocents, and when cadavers walk the earth to instigate mayhem, happy days are most definitely not ahead of us. Dark days indeed....

Now, even though I was interested in this game from the start, I never actually bothered to check it out. The primary reason is that I just don't care for MMOs because I often find the premise to be sabotaged by the restrictive nature of a MMO design (more on that later). What is more, when The Secret World first launched, it was the standard MMO dealie of needing to purchase the base game followed by a reoccurring monthly membership fee. Not gonna happen. A game developer will get one out of me, but not both. So this game just dropped off my radar.

Now, however, things have changed. Fueled by my new found love of urban fantasy, I recalled this game and eagerly sought it out. Sure, it is not a cyberpunk-themed urban fantasy as is Shadowrun Returns (too bad), but it is definitely of the same vein what with its theme of a contemporary setting where "every myth, conspiracy theory and urban legend was true". Close enough for me! Even better, I discovered it has since gone down the Guild Wars route of ditching the monthly subscription. Great! Excited by the game's prospects, I requested a free three day pass from the community and off I went into The Secret World....

....And landed smack in a by-the-numbers MMORPG. Darn it.

The game starts off interestingly enough with a compelling cutscene where your custom designed character has a weird dream about being forced to chose a side in a coming conflict. Upon awakening, he discovers that he has acquired magical powers...powers he can barely control. Days pass and your character is seen mastering his new gifts. Eventually a knock on his apartment door is heard and depending upon which faction the player has chosen during the character creation process - the Templars, the Illuminati, or the Dragons - a messenger summons the player to the HQ of his specific faction where he is to be briefed on the new reality of monsters and magic becoming part of the world once again. All of this is executed very well. The cutscenes are nicely rendered, the dialogue is sharp, and the voice acting is quite excellent.

This solid introduction comes to an end and the player is off on his first assignment to combat "the Filth" (great term!) that is slowly corrupting the world. Tragically, it is here that I first felt my enthusiasm for the game slipping. In a bizarre move, The Secret World, a game that describes itself as being about vampires hunting "for mortal blood in London nightclubs" and about demons "lurking in the shadows of Seoul", incongruously decides to deposit the player in the decidedly un-urban Maine city of Kingsmouth, a classic small New England town that is thematically as far removed from an urban setting as possible. In fact, it isn't all that far removed from the typical medieval villages players usually encounter in a MMORPG, one of the cliched settings this game was supposedly going to buck. I really was dumbfounded by this choice. Now, that is not to say that the game doesn't do a good job of realizing this setting - Kingsmouth proves to be brought to life with vivid detail - but New York it is not.


This disappointment was quickly followed by another: the typically dull "gofer" (aka: "Fed-ex") missions that are part and parcel of the MMO genre - this is where you need to go someplace, collect a certain amount of something and bring it back to the mission giver. Boring. However, even here there is some nice chrome on hand as each story mission gets its own fully voiced cutscene, something that does serve to make these threadbare missions seem as something more important than just pointless grinds for XP...which is what they really are.

So my character sets out on his first gofer mission and discovers another tiring MMO convention: the large packs of monsters - in this case, trite zombies - roaming the countryside. Again, this is a failing of the core MMO design: if you are going to have potentially hundreds of people playing the game simultaneously, you need to make sure there are plenty of baddies hanging around so everyone gets a chance to play the part of the hero. Same thing here. Even worse, these packs usually respawn quite quickly, too, so as to further ensure no shortages of moving targets, a convention that I have always found counteracts any sense of progress in clearing out the bad guys. Sigh.

The triteness of packs of roving monsters is particularly bad in TSW due to the nature of the game itself, and here's why: the early part of the TSW goes to great lengths to try and convince the player that he is standing at the threshold of a new reality, one that the rest of the world is still largely oblivious to (albeit, a recent "terrorist attack" in the Tokyo subway system might change that). Fine. But judging by the massive amount of beasties roaming the Kingsmouth / Solomon Island locale, this isn't the beginning of a gradual infiltration by the Filth, but rather it is a full-on invasion that is anything but secret! I was really disappointed by this because I was hoping my character was going to be involved in an gradually escalating investigation into a paranormal presence - indeed, that is precisely how this initial mission was described. But upon entering Kingsmouth, it is clear that you are just another grunt in a battle for an entire town under open assault by paranormal forces! How is the "Secret World" remaining secret when entire towns are being overrun with otherworldly armies?!?

And then I came to the combat. Ugh. I hate MMO combat. I hate the button-mashing, I hate the stilted combat animations, and I hate the repetition. And it is all here. It did help a little that unlike fantasy-themed MMORPGS, The Secret World's modern setting permits the use of all sorts of firearms, from pistols to assault rifles. That is cool, but it would have been all the more "cooler" if the combat was skilled based, if the player could aim and fire the weapons himself like in a third-person shooter, instead of just hitting a button and watching the game roll some dice and produce a scripted combat animation. Still, being able to go into combat with duel pistols makes for a nice change of pace. Other weapons are available too, like bladed instruments, war hammers, and magic, of course, and players are free to mix and match as they see fit by using earned skill and attribute points to unlock new weapons and increase their deadliness. Again, nice...but still not the MMO revolution I was hoping TSW would deliver.

After an hour or two, I was quickly tiring of the stale MMO conventions that I had experienced in the game so far. The Secret World promised to be something different, but it wasn't. It was the same formulaic MMORPG I have played and abandoned many times before. If only this title was a single player RPG, something that would allow it to break free from the tired necessities of the MMO template! Then this setting could really shine as Shadowrun Return shines. Then we would truly have something special. But it wasn't, and we didn't. Sadly, I resolved to uninstall the game the next day.

But I didn't.

Instead, I found myself logging back in...for some reason I couldn't quite explain (witchcraft?). And once again I quickly found myself gritting my teeth as I suffered through the banal MMO conventions that littered this game. But why couldn't I stop playing it?

I decided that it was those darn missions. Those introductory cutscenes were really well done, and served as a preprandial treat to the actual meat of the quest. But more so that that, some of the quests were actually interesting in their own right. Sure, there were a bunch of those boring gofer quests, but even some of them were suitably spooky and fit in well with the "end days" theme of the game, leading me to actually looking forward to their final resolution. Not only that, but I eventually discovered that the game includes some nice artwork to compliment these quests. For example, when I uncovered a newspaper article relevant to a certain quest, instead of getting what I expected - a pop up window with a transcription of the article - I instead got an actual picture of the article. In another mission I located a cell phone and was treated to an actual in-game image of the phone with relevant text message. I was happy to discover that TSW didn't take the lazy route of just text, text, and more text, but incorporates the sort of art assets one usually encounters in an old school point and click adventure.

Now, in addition to these rather straight-forward gofer quests, I discovered two other types that did add some nice variety to the game. For example, The Secret World has some very interesting investigation missions. In these quests, the player is presented a mystery that he must solve. Now, solving these missions breaks with the linear nature of the gofer quests by usually requiring the player to go outside of the game and research topics on wikipedia, or even visiting some faux webpages created especialy for the game, to find the necessary bit of info that advances the story. Frankly, this is something I have wanted to see in a MMO for a very long time (I mean, the player is forced to be constantly online anyway, so why not make use of the internet in the game?). While I do think that these investigation missions can be ridiculously hard, largely because the game sort of dumps the player at a narrative dead end and expects him to pull his hair out until he finds the right course of action (thank the maker for the helpful wikis out there!), the mere existence of such puzzle quests really adds a sense of novelty, and mental challenge, to TSW.


Then there are the sabotage missions. Like the investigation missions, these made for a refreshing change of pace to the standard gofer missions. In fact, these missions are much closer to what I hoped would be the norm for The Secret World: quests that don't involve simplistic "kill this" or "fetch that" quest templates, but involve doing something much more suitably convert for a secret society operative, things such as infiltrating a facility, or needing to disable a security system, or even hacking a terminal. What is more, unlike the other quests, these missions involve isolated instances, something that slows the pace of the game and narrows the focus to just one player at a time - you! Because you are alone in these quests they are much more creepy, especially since they usually involve a boss monster of some type hiding in the shadows, awaiting its final battle. This is something that definitely adds to the "dark days are coming" paranormal feeling. Again, these sabotage missions are much closer to what I had hoped to find in TSW, something much more representative of a slow paced investigation into the paranormal rather than the open warfare, you-are-late-to-the-party nature of the main game world.

So I played a bunch of missions that second night and discovered some I really liked, many that were completely forgettable, and a handful that were just plain weird, but still concluded that The Secret World just wasn't my type of game. I would delete it after logging out.

But I didn't.

Instead I found myself logging in once again the following night. And I still didn't know why! What kept drawing me back?!?

This time I thought it was the oppressive nature of the setting of Kingsmouth - it really put its hooks into me. As I wrote earlier, this locale is something less than the exciting urban setting I was initially hoping for. Really, it is just a pastiche of the many small towns that have graced countless horror movies (particularly Antonio Island from The Fog - a deadly fog even haunts TSW's Solomon Island!). Be that as it may, Funcom has nonetheless managed to bring some real horror to this in-game setting. Despite the ridiculous amount of zombies and other creatures plaguing every nook and cranny of the town, not to mention the many cliched horror plot points borrowed by the various missions, the setting nevertheless becomes a very disturbing place after awhile. I didn't really appreciate this until I left Kingsmouth to return to my HQ back in London (I was in search of some cosmetic improvements - TSW seems very stingy with clothes and gear). While there, I found a local pub where I was able to listen in on a conversation between two long time Templars. As with much of the game, the writing was very good, and the tale they told was interesting as well as being informative of the game's backstory. But what really struck me was how I was relaxing for the first time in a long while. The background noise of happy patrons chattering away, not to mention the pleasure of not seeing a single filthy monster anywhere in sight really was a breath of fresh air after my time on Solomon Island. When it finally came time for me to depart this cosmopolitan slice of reality, I actually found myself dreading the return to the hellhole of Kingsmouth. It was then that I realized that The Secret World, despite all the limitations attendant to a MMO, actually had achieved something of what it promised to do: give us a chance to experience truly "dark days".

This realization of just what an unceasing horror show Kingsmouth actually was made me even more committed to following through on the quests to rid the town of its curse and restore some normalcy - despite the fact that my Templar supervisor warned me that my purpose was to investigate and not save; there are no conquering heroes when confronted with such evil. So I set out with gusto exploring Kingsmouth, now more determined than ever, but soon discovered something disconcerting: Kingsmouth is significantly bigger than I had first thought. While most of the initial missions take place within the reasonably sized town itself, the entire questing area of Solomon Island is at least three times bigger, with entire sections locked off until...who know when? This was going to take longer than I thought!

For the first time, I didn't log out of the game with the idea of deleting my account. Instead I planned to return the next night to uncover some more of the horror plaguing my first assignment.

But I never returned.

My trial had ran out.


Will I return to The Secret World? Incredibly, my answer is an unexpected "yes!" Even though this game suffers from all the frustrating shortcomings of the MMO genre, in the final analysis TSW managed to deliver on its (urban) fantasy premise in a very entertaining way. And let's be fair here: I've only sampled a handful of hours from the starting location of a game that has been under development for two years now. Having safely launched the game with boilerplate MMO content (this starting slice of TSW just screams safe game design), hopefully Funcom has since added material that is more daring. And even if they haven't taken that more adventurous step, I still have to say that what is in the game so far seems sufficient to keep me entertained for...well, certainly a few hours more, anyway.

Having said that, I should point out that I haven't actually purchased the game yet. Even though I am hankering to get back into The Secret World, I decided to put it on ice for a bit yet because, frankly, TSW is going to make for some fine Halloween gaming (especially seeing how Kingsmouth is decorated with jack-o-lanterns; apparently the dark days of the secret world arrived with the dark days of autumn). Of course, if a sale happens along I will not hesitate to jump on the game (TSW often sees 50% price cuts), but with that exception I will be content to wait until at least summer is officially over. The Secret World is so dark at times that I fear I will tear a hole in the universe and spill demons into our reality if I play the game in the sunlight of summer.

Well, that is the plan, anyway. When it comes to The Secret World, anything is possible. The game certainly made that clear.

[As usual, a better edited version of this article appears on my main blog: http://burkesjoystick.blogspot.com/2...et-world.html]
Categories: Blogs

I have to ask: why am I so stupid?

Forums: Latest Threads - Fri, 08/22/2014 - 05:54
Recently I posted a comment on another site promoting the idea of making ships cloaked (invisible) for Star Citizen. Not mentioning names but most were adamantly against it despite the fact 99% never tried it! How on earth do people come to conclusions about something they know nothing about? Incredible. And their arguments were just brain numbing, especially the old Chris Roberts said he doesn't want to make an EVE 2.0 argument. Of course he doesn't want to make an EVE 2.0; and I don't want to play an EVE 2.0. What does that have to do with anything? EVE didn't invent cloaking! They got it from Star Trek and no doubt Gene Roddenberry got it from mythology going back hundreds of years. Evochron also has cloaking but for some strange reason it's once again about 'not' being another EVE. God people are stupid.

And I faced this kind of stupidity before. Like when I pushed for outside designers/ship contest and Fanbois went ballistic. 95% of the comments were adamantly opposed to it. Fast forward and ta-da! Amazing ships all thanks to outside designers and a competition!!! Now the Fanbois are all ga-ga over the ships. dumb asses.

And then there was the time I called out the crappy flight controls shortly after Arena Commanders release. You should have heard how defensive the Fanbois were about the buggered mechanics. And I wasn't the only one. Many realized the poor mechanics needed changing and fortunately Chris Roberts agreed and soon we will have all 6 mods of movement in the next patch - for both coupled and decoupled modes. But you can bet your sweet beepee that Fanbois will continue jumping to the defense of anything CIG puts out - even though it is in Alpha.

I could go on and on about Fanbois. They have to be some of the dumbest people on the planet. But I really should feel sorry for them because studies have proven that Fanbois have an inferiority complex and tend to look at criticism of their chosen product as some kind of personal failure; as a result they tend to overreact or simply scream bloody murder when someone doesn't march lockstep with them. Besides, if there is anyone that is stupid - it's me. Because I keep trying to reason with them. God I am a dumb-ass.
Categories: Forums

Star Citizen: if you can get pass all the rabid Fanbois......

Forums: Latest Threads - Wed, 08/13/2014 - 20:30
Just wanted to add something to GAMESQUAD that demonstrates the awesomeness of Star Citizen. A lot of people probably think I am all about criticizing Chris Roberts but that is far from the case. I have always promoted Star Citizen. What I don't promote is worshiping the ground Mr. Roberts walks on; nor do I promote the intolerant atmosphere promoted by Fanbois and Fanboi moderators. What's more, I find pushing the 'community' meme pathetically transparent in terms of ginning up profits. Yes I am a Star Citizen fan but one who believes criticism can be a good thing. Unfortunately there is very little open criticism on RSI Forums for fear of getting banned; meanwhile the constant emphasis on money and profit is making SC look more and more like a 'Publisher' based game with each passing day.

But if you can get pass all that, if you simply want to feel like you are actually IN space and experiencing the most graphically intense, beautifully crafted planets and asteroid fields ever created; if flying ships, traversing the universe and scattering your enemy's remains across the system is your only concern - then do I have a game for you!

Star Citizen -- ALL Trailers! (Gamescom 2014):

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZdjFpYC6czI

Overview:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PK6612AqI_Q

Single Player Mode:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O9sHhhobvAc

Multiplayer Mode:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Lms1TbFAhGQ

Ship tour/Deluxe Hangar:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=88513y47P7c

Upcoming Asteroid Hangar:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kU9kVyG6QWQ

Commercials:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g0gZES2pTWk

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CuwMKX0h2ec

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GB5PqK7q0_M

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vO7RxsZpcKc

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xIII81zWCSs

The Next Great Starship:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZffXKdokPwA

Around The Verse (weekly broadcast):

https://www.youtube.com/playlist?lis...9fTTq-X8Kt49nX

Upcoming Planetside:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BeQfK9hrfDY

A great video that accidentally stumbles on great things yet to come?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9qGSR0y1T_Y

Oculus Rift:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BQipmvi3t0M

Cool Vids:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6nZmzWu39mY

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X2EN8GJGfUU

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZH0jbr6DjNo

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Za5lR7yMqaE

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9cLeXj4p03k

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Sg7BuwyP50o
Categories: Forums

Battle Academy 2

Forums: Latest Threads - Tue, 08/12/2014 - 20:04
Combat Missionx2 has the looks, but the BA series has ways had the better MP in my opinion. I hope when BA 2 releases in September, the BA1 complete DLC package goes on sale.

Anyhoo....

Quote: Not so quiet on the Eastern Front!
Official release date and Steam version announced for Battle Academy 2

Epsom, UK – August 12, 2014.

“The German army is a machine, and machines can be broken!” (Konstantin Rokossovsky – Marshal of the Soviet Union)

June 21, 1941 – The German army suddenly turns east and embarks on its ambitious Operation Barbarossa intended to put German troops to Moscow in a couple of weeks. This was the first move of a frightful 4-years conflict that involved millions of soldiers, tanks and weapons of all genres.

In Battle Academy 2, players will have the possibility to join both sides and re-fight some of the key operations that made the east front legendary. Building on the qualities of its predecessor, the gameplay of Battle Academy 2 will preserve both the accessibility and dynamism that built its reputation while enhancing it with brand new tactical tools and vast amounts of new content as well. There are 4 campaigns, a random map generator, multiplayer modes with cooperative and versus gameplay and a unique skirmish mode that allows to generate an infinite number of customized scenarios, players should prepare for long, tough journey on the Eastern Front!

Today we have the pleasure to unveil the official release date of the game: Battle Academy 2 will be available on both our sites and Steam on September 12th. The press has already begun previewing the game “a very playable and solidly entertaining game.” (Armchair General), “hats off to Slitherine, random terrain engines of this calibre are ludicrously rare in contemporary PC wargaming” (Rock Paper Shotgun), so watch out for more coverage and get ready for the release!


Get more information on Battle Academy 2 from its official product page.
http://www.slitherine.com/games/ba2_pc That random terrain generator could prove to be a big draw!
Categories: Forums

Mr. Roberts, your games rock - but honesty will go a long way

Forums: Latest Threads - Mon, 08/11/2014 - 21:30
Chris Roberts is great at making games! Math however is not one of his strong suits. I say this because recently Mr. Roberts attempted to justify ongoing crowd funding in his latest 'Letter from the Chairman' by stating, and I quote: 'To sustain this level of development we need to keep bringing in additional funds. Star Citizen is still much less than other published backed AAAgames that have similar levels of ambition (some would even say a little less) like GTA V, Watch Dogs or Destiny' (1).

I found this statement particularly at odds with reality given Mr. Roberts himself stated that his model of funding (Direct PC Model vs. Traditional PC Model) enables him '4 times the revenue.....so with a quarter of the people we can make the same game'. So by Mr. Robert's graph - clearly presented at 13:35 - he is able to invest 80% of revenue towards development as where Grand Theft Auto V was able to only invest 20% (2). Consequently it would appear that when Star Citizen reaches $50 million, which will likely be achieved next week, SC will have invested $40 million directly as where GTA development investment stands at $52 million (if GTA's $265 million/£170 million budget is correct).

Clearly, by Mr. Robert's own math, Star Citizen is only 15 million (80% of which equals 12 million) short of reaching GTAs development goal - a goal which in all likelihood will be achieved next year. Given that Grande Theft Auto V stands as the most expensive game ever developed, I find it odd that Mr. Roberts would state in a recent newsletter that 'Star Citizen is still much less than other published backed AAAgames', when in fact it is already above and beyond most AAAgames! In fact, Star Citizen is likely to surpass GTA this time next year if the present trend continues. Not bad considering Star Citizen is approximately at the halfway point before release!!!

Clearly Star Citizen still needs to continue funding as it is no doubt the most ambitious project ever attempted. I for one support continued crowd funding but at a certain point we have to be honest with ourselves and stop using other games as a point of reference to justify prices and marketing strategies. Pointing to other games budgets is one thing; pointing to other games while ignoring one's own development cost is another. At least if Mr. Robert's math is to be believed.


(1) https://robertsspaceindustries.com/c...m-The-Chairman

(2) http://www.gamasutra.com/view/news/2...is_Roberts.php
Categories: Forums

Act of Aggression

Forums: Latest Threads - Sat, 08/09/2014 - 21:00
Eugen's next RTS:

Quote: Eugen Systems, the studio behind the million-unit selling Wargame series of RTS games and the critically acclaimed Act of War (2005) or R.U.S.E (2010), is back! Set in a modern, techno-thriller setting, their new game promises to be a perfect cocktail of political intrigue, high fidelity visuals and solid mechanics with old-school RTS values.

Act of Aggression vows to bring about a return to the 90's Golden Era of real time strategy games, delivering all of the core mechanics sorely missed by many RTS fans: base building, resource management, unit production and dynamic, immersive battles will meet high fidelity production values and intelligent modernization. Today's images and teaser trailer provide a first look at the game, to be showcased at the Gamescom next week.

In what is shaping up to be their most ambitious project since Act of War, Eugen Systems will deliver a real-time strategy experience set in the 2020's in a darkly realistic future where 3 major factions fight for their interests. In a world where international crisis and financial order is set in a seemingly unending loop, the shadowy organization known as "The Cartel" attempt to complete a secret agenda with high-tech technology, stolen prototypes and stealthy operatives. Against this looming threat stands the Chimere, a UNO funded, classified military organization specialized in fast strikes, which attempts to maintain global peace and order. Finally, somewhere between the two stands the US Army, worn out by two decades of being kept on a war footing with too few replacements, but still fielding a great deal of battle-hardened veterans.

Act of Aggression will include two separate single player campaigns, featuring traditional RTS storytelling and game mechanics: gathering resources, building a base, producing units ... but also supplies to keep the war machine rolling. In true Eugen style, expect vast, skill-based multiplayer modes where technological upgrades, resource storage and base defenses will play an integral role in the battle. Extend your base, defend your structures, and create new bases to control key strategic areas on the map. Unleash infantry, mechanized vehicles, tanks, artillery, helicopters, planes, and super weapons, earning experience as you destroy the enemy's forces and preserve yours (as they get more experienced), unlock skills and abilities to turn the tide of war by specializing them in roles, such as anti-air, anti-tank, etc... With steady development of new technologies, your production capacities will grow always more powerful, unlocking new buildings, units, and ultimate weapons far beyond technologies of today!

As with Wargame: Dragon Rising, this is a game that looks good...but I am prepared to wait for a deep sale before I buy it. As I mentioned before, I am getting a little annoyed with Eugen in that they release a game, but before it gets a chance to flower Eugen is off and running onto the next game. For example, they released RUSE and then rushed off to Wargame:EE. Wargame:EE was released, and off they rushed to Wargame:ALB. Before ALB even had its legs under it, they were off and working on Wargame: Dragon Rising (which was a real tragedy as there were a whole host of NATO/WP WWIII theaters left to explore). And before Dragon Rising has even learned to walk, they are announcing AoA. This is why I refuse to pay full price for Dragon Rising. Even though I had fun with ALB, I know DR is going to be abandoned before too much longer. Why should I pay full price for that?
Categories: Forums
Syndicate content